MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Ed Caffrey's Workshop

Ed Caffrey's Workshop Talk to Ed Caffrey ... The Montana Bladesmith! Tips, tricks and more from an ABS Mastersmith.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-21-2021, 12:16 PM
bjmac bjmac is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: WAY up northern CA
Posts: 32
? re: mokume gane

Ed, some time ago (in a land far away!) you told me that once i use my forge for making mokume, that I could not use it for Damascus. Does that include heat treat after shaping ? and what is the reason for the removal of Damascus? and are any other prohibitions other than damascus? thanks, Bruce
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-21-2021, 06:39 PM
KenH KenH is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: South Baldwin Co across the bay from Mobile, AL
Posts: 70
I'll be VERY interested in Ed's reply - I can't imagine why making mokume would have any affect (effect?) on Damascus.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-22-2021, 07:46 AM
Ed Caffrey's Avatar
Ed Caffrey Ed Caffrey is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Great Falls, Montana, USA
Posts: 4,338
Send a message via AIM to Ed Caffrey Send a message via Yahoo to Ed Caffrey
NO! Not "USE" the forge for making mokume.... but IF you happen to MELT any non-ferrous material IN your forge while making mokume. (Mokume is always non-ferrous materials) Also, the size of the problem/fix is relative to the amount/size of non-ferrous that melted.

The biggest offender is copper, but most any non-ferrous will produce a gas when it melts, that permeates the entire forge lining, and in the case of ceramic fiber blanket, the only way to remove it is to TOTALLY tear out the lining and redo it.

Castable lining is a bit easier... wire brush the spot(s) where a drop/drip landed until you take out about 1/8" deep, then patch it with kiln cement or whatever castable.

In coal forges with cast iron firepots, it requires grinding away the surface of the cast iron in the spot/area that the material melted/stuck to..... and in some cases, if the amount of non-ferrous material is large, discarding that firepot, because the melted material gets into the cast iron pores and by the time it's ground out, the firepot wall is too thin.

I've experienced all three scenarios, two of them when I too new/ignorant to know what I was doing was a bad thing, and the third when I was hosting a Hammer-In, and some knucklehead threw .22 casings into my welding forge (which is why Ed has hosted exactly ONE Hammer-In, and no more)


__________________
WWW.CAFFREYKNIVES.NET

Caffreyknives@gmail.com

"Nobody cares what you know.....until they know you care."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-22-2021, 08:10 AM
bjmac bjmac is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: WAY up northern CA
Posts: 32
Thanks for the reply, Ed. So, to make certain that I understand , I only have to redo my forge if I melt and spill mokume in the forge. There is no problem with the making of mokume, right?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-22-2021, 08:45 AM
Ed Caffrey's Avatar
Ed Caffrey Ed Caffrey is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Great Falls, Montana, USA
Posts: 4,338
Send a message via AIM to Ed Caffrey Send a message via Yahoo to Ed Caffrey
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjmac View Post
Thanks for the reply, Ed. So, to make certain that I understand , I only have to redo my forge if I melt and spill mokume in the forge. There is no problem with the making of mokume, right?
Yes.... that is correct.

This is a situation where having an ACCURATE pyrometer installed in your forge, AND knowing the lowest melting point of the materials you're using for mokume, can save you a ton of heartache, work, and money.


__________________
WWW.CAFFREYKNIVES.NET

Caffreyknives@gmail.com

"Nobody cares what you know.....until they know you care."
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-22-2021, 09:44 AM
bjmac bjmac is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: WAY up northern CA
Posts: 32
very , very good to know. thanks
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-23-2021, 10:08 AM
KenH KenH is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: South Baldwin Co across the bay from Mobile, AL
Posts: 70
As I said in my post I never even considered making mokume in the forge. Since the issue seems to be the copper, or other non-ferrous metals releasing a gas that ruins the ceramic blade or other insulation.

Just how does it "ruin" the insulation? Is it because the copper gas gets in the insulation and ruins the insulation property of the insulation so it doesn't do a good job of insulation?

Based on this I suspect it's not a good idea at all to use the forge for melting copper or brass to cast up a fitting either. I have been thinking about trying that, but won't be doing that now. Thanks Ed.

Ken H>
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bee, blade, brass, ca, case, ceramic, damascus, forge, grinding, hammer, heat, heat treat, iron, knife, make, making, material, materials, mokume, post, problem, surface, thin, welding


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
WTB Mokume gane M.TEX The Damascus Forum 0 05-21-2011 08:58 PM
mokume? Brett Holmes The Damascus Forum 2 11-14-2006 06:40 PM
mokume gane Delbert Ealy The Outpost 4 04-30-2006 07:33 AM
88 cent Mokume Gane stoneman The Outpost 18 08-08-2004 10:22 AM
Mokume Dragon Knife Collecting 36 05-31-2002 09:39 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:07 PM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved