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Tool Time Let's talk shop. Equipment, Tips & Tricks, Safety issues - Post it here.

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  #1  
Old 11-05-2003, 01:05 PM
beebee58 beebee58 is offline
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Location: akron,ohio
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Dust Collection

It's about time I invested in a dust collection system, so I need some input.
I work in the basement, and only run one machine at a time. I have a overhead filtration system that is made from a "furnace" motor. It does a good job on the air bourne stuff (3 filters, 2 in and 1 out). I have it located above the Belt grinder, other sanders, and the wood bandsaw. But as usual there is a pile of "Black" dust below my grinder, so I have decieded it is time to have a collection system that will handle the stuff that the filtration system misses (falls to the ground). I have looked at several differant types and don't know what to think.
Type 1. Is a stationary type that you run hoses from the unit to the machine, more vac. but takes more space, somewhat quiet.
Type 2. Is a portable type that you move from machine to machine, slightly less vac. less space lost in your shop, more noise than type 1.
Both type 1 and type 2 are about the same cost so that is not a decieding factor.
I'm considering the "Type 2" and leaving it stationary under some other piece of equipment.
O.K. now my questions.
1. How much vac. do you need ?
2. I have heard of people adding a stack to there collectors on the "inlet" side, then putting furnace filters on the stack to quiet the system down. Any body tried this ?
3. What size micron's do I use for the filters ?
4. Or anything else that I should consider ?
Thanks in advance for any input !!!
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  #2  
Old 11-06-2003, 08:31 AM
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Jeff Higgins Jeff Higgins is offline
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This is a concern of mine too, BB. We should start a nice long thread on this. I'll tell you what my system is currently, and what I intend in the future.

Right now I have a 18 gallon shop vac hooked up to my BIII. If I am grinding steel, I put a bucket of water under it. Kind of old-school, but cost-effective. When I am doing handle materials I have a 4"x9" funnel I fabbed out of sheetmetal attached under the platen or wheel to draw the grinding dust into the vacuum. It works quite well, and I use a QD pin to attach it so I can remove it easily.

Right now, I have only one vacuum for the BIII. I have other grinders though, and although I don't use them as much, when I do its a hassle to keep clean. Its a real pita to stop and clean up before I track stuff around (especially into the house where my old lady would beat me senseless if she steps on a steel shaving or something). Soon, I hope to get a few projects I have going finished, and then a dust collection system is my next gig.

I'll probably go with a Grizzly dust collector. The model G1028Z looks pretty good. That, a .3 micron bag, and I should be good to go. I'll most likely run the steel duct from the DC to my grinding area, and flex hose from the steel duct to the grinders.

This setup, along with a good ceiling air cleaner and a good respirator should keep me breathing for a long time. Now all I have to figure out os how to expense for that bottle of 20-year old Balvenie I just bought...


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Old 11-06-2003, 04:03 PM
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Geno Geno is offline
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Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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If we found a use for recylcled grinding dust, dust collectors would be more popular.
Most(like myself) use big fans, water buckets, and maybe a dust mask.
I think a shop manifold system would work best. Portable units might be a hassle to move and may not get used as a result.
The big systems have each machine attached with gates to control the suction.You only run vaccum where it is needed at the time.
I don't have the formulas for you.
I wish I could give a better answer, but I don't have a recovery system.For me it is a broom and dust pan twice a year weather it needs it or not.It is not very efficient, but it IS cheap enough.

1. The bigger unit, the better
2.Motors should be outside if possible for noise and dust.
3. Duct work with air gates is best.
4. Don't wait until your my age to start worrying about what goes into your lungs.
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Old 11-07-2003, 08:06 AM
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Jeff Higgins Jeff Higgins is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Geno

1. The bigger unit, the better
2.Motors should be outside if possible for noise and dust.
3. Duct work with air gates is best.
4. Don't wait until your my age to start worrying about what goes into your lungs.
Sound advice, Gene. You Texas boys sure got it easy though. Not too much trouble with heating issues. You see, up here in the cold New England woods, an outside dust collector would suck out all the precious heat from the shop. It pretty much means it has to be inside year round.


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Old 11-07-2003, 09:29 AM
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Drac Drac is offline
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There's a book that Grizzly carries (and severial other companies) that cover dust collection systems. I go a copy at home and it covers all the formulas and saftey precations. It's worth the couple dollars. I'm getting a setup in trade for some work on a knife.

Hope this helps,
Jim


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Old 11-07-2003, 09:59 AM
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Geno Geno is offline
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Now a heater is another story.
My kerosene heater stinks(litterally).
I use a blow drier for that too.
Just lift your shirt and blow warm air up into your clothes, instant warm.AAAHHHHHHHHH!
It knocks the chill clean off of you.
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Old 11-08-2003, 10:20 AM
OutWest OutWest is offline
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In designing your system, consider the hot sparks. I seem to learn by doing, lots of melted plastic intakes, flex tubing, etc. Now my system uses all metal duct work/intakes, spark mitigation, two dust traps. Control the hot sparks (long duct runs or water traps) first if you have cloth or fiber filters.
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