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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 02-13-2018, 10:02 PM
KevBooth KevBooth is offline
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CA as a wood finish?

Has anyone tried using super glue (CA), as a finish on a wood handle?
Thanks
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:21 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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I haven't tried wood with CA, but on whitetail antler it worked pretty well Kevin. It also depends on the type of Cyano-Acrylate you use l would suppose too. I'm not an expert on the different types, I've only used the Maxi-Cure CA from Texas Knifemaking Supplies for finishing and I hate to say it. Super Glue from Walmart. Antler is very absorbent, but many woods are not.

On wood I usually use epoxy thinned out with lacquer thinner or acetone. I use several coats with my method. I thin the epoxy to the same consistency as the acetone. (Lacquer Thinner contains acetone) and paint on a layer time after time. I may take several days to fill in open grained woods like Wenge wood. This is not stabilized wood, just better than plain wax and polyethylene. With unstabilizable woods like cocobolo (too oily) it fills in the little crevices that the material has. I am aware of a chef's knife I made in 2003 that is still going strong made from cocobolo.

A good test to see if it may work with what you are using is to simply paint some on and see if the wood absorbs it. Walnut or Maple will suck it up, but Desert Ironwood would not and doesn't need it. Experimentation is the key here and some would tell you to send it out for stabilization.

I hope I have confused you enough Kevin. Have a nice day.
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:51 AM
epicfail48 epicfail48 is offline
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Wood handles no, but I've used it on pens. Wouldn't recommend it, it looks good but it's slicker than greased snot, last thing you want is a knife flying out of your hand cause you couldn't keep a grip on it. For woods that aren't oily exotics or resin stabilized, I'm fond of pure oil finishes, the ones like Tung, linseed and the like that absorb into the wood but don't leave a thick film. Bring out the wood, protect it, make it look good, but they don't make it slick. I stick to plain boiled linseed oil for mine, but I've used tru-oil in the past to good results.

For dense, oily hardwood and the like, I'm pretty fond of buffing with some scotchbrite and a coat of paste wax. Makes the wood look fantastic without flying off to neverland
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Old 02-14-2018, 03:30 PM
KevBooth KevBooth is offline
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Filling in the poores in Wenge was the intended purpose. When you say epoxy, do you mean a 2part glue epoxy? Iím realitivly new at this.
Thanks.
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Old 02-15-2018, 10:11 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Yes Kevin, I use a 30 min 2 part epoxy. You can also use a wood filler too for it as well. Problem is finding a filler that matches the Wenge color, I did it one time using a white wood filler for a contrasting effect to the Wenge wood and it turned out nice after I sealed it with epoxy glue and then sanded it off with 800 grit then 1200 and it really shined. With Wenge wood you might not want to thin the second coat of epoxy as it will take a while to fill in the grooves.

Oh I should add I always finish with hand sanding with epoxy, also the CA glue won't soak into the hard wood of Wenge very much at all, just fill in the very open grain that it has. You can use either method, they have a super glue that is a gel like what I get from TXKMS and you can thin it out as well with acetone or lacquer thinner, no need to wait for epoxy to setup and dry. Just sand the surface off like I do to get rid of the slippery issue brought up by Epic.

Last edited by jimmontg; 02-15-2018 at 10:27 PM. Reason: add
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antler, ca, chef's, chef's knife, desert ironwood, epoxy, finish, glue, handle, ironwood, knife, knifemaking, made, maple, material, paint, resin, stabilization, supplies, walnut, wax, white, wood, woods


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