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High-Performance Blades Sharing ideas for getting the most out of our steel.

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  #1  
Old 03-08-2005, 06:32 PM
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praktis praktis is offline
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chemicaL analysis of 1090

could someone tell me what 1090 consists of.
i would like to se if i can find something here att home that is the same as 1090. to do this i need to know what it consists of.

thanks in advance


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Old 03-08-2005, 06:56 PM
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Terry Primos Terry Primos is offline
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praktis,
The designation of 1095 tells you a lot about it's composition. The first number specifies the primary alloying element. The second number represents the approximate percentage of the primary alloying element present. The last two numbers represent the approximate carbon content in one hundredths of one percent.

Here's how you break it down:

1 - Plain Carbon steel (non-alloy)
0 - No significant alloying elements
90 - Approximately 0.90% carbon

Depending on the manufacturer, 1090 should have between 0.60% - 0.90% manganese. Even though designated as 1090, the carbon content can vary as well. There are allowable ranges. A general breakdown accounting for the variances would look like this:

1090
Carbon: 0.90% - 1.03%
Manganese: 0.60% - 0.90%

If you want to know more about the designation and composition of various steels you can check out a couple of articles on my web site:

Effects of Alloying Elements in Steel
Composition of Knife Steels


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Old 03-09-2005, 03:20 PM
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praktis praktis is offline
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Thanks terry,
here in Sweden they use a totally different system when they name their steel sorts. (it?s closer to 2 different ways.) all depends on the maker.
as an example. one maker calls his steel ss2260 another calls it Rigor (A2 in USA)
ss2140 another calls it Arne (O1 in USA) ss2310 another calls it Sverker 21 (D2 in USA)

so it can be a pain in the behind sometimes.


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Last edited by praktis; 03-09-2005 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 03-09-2005, 04:53 PM
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Terry Primos Terry Primos is offline
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We have multiple systems for designating steel here too. I cover a couple of them in another article on my website. If you're interested, the link is:

Steel Classification

One of them groups steels by their purpose or unique properties. The first letter designates the classification, such as:
  • W2 - The W represents Water hardening
  • S7 - The S represents Shock resisting
  • O1 - The O represents Oil hardening
  • L6 - The L represents Low allow, special purpose
  • A2 - The A represents Air hardening
  • D2 - The D represents Die steel
  • M2 - The M represents Molybdenum alloy, high speed steel

Then there's the one I mentioned above which I find more useful. It's the UNS (Unified Numbering System) where the numbers actually give you a representation of the chemical composition, such as:
  • 1084 - Plain carbon, no significant alloy, approximately 0.84% carbon
  • 5160 - Chromium alloy, approximately 1.0% chromium, approximately 0.60% carbon
  • 52100 - Chromium alloy, approximately 2.0% chromium, approximately 1.0% carbon

In this system the approximate percentage of the primary alloying element is rounded either up or down. For example 5160 (depending on the manufacturer) would have somewhere between 0.70% - 0.90% chromium, but since it is higher than 0.50% it get rounded up to 1.0%. But 50100B has approximately 0.45% chromium so it gets rounded down to 0.0%.


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Last edited by Terry Primos; 03-09-2005 at 04:55 PM.
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Old 03-27-2021, 12:22 PM
Pop Alexandra Pop Alexandra is offline
 
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Thanks, Terry. Really useful input and glossary.
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