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Fit & Finish Fit and Finish = the difference in "good art" and "fine art." Join in, as we discuss the fine art of finish and embellishment.

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  #1  
Old 05-13-2004, 11:28 AM
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Jeremy Krammes Jeremy Krammes is offline
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Carbon Fiber

I'm going to get some CF soon, and was wondering if I had to worry about the edges flaking on me. Can I just round them like I would any other handel material. I found some info on finishing CF in the archives, but nothing about the edges.

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Old 05-16-2004, 09:12 AM
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I've not had a problem with rounding the edges. I take it to about 800 grit.


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Old 05-16-2004, 11:45 AM
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Thanks for your reply.

Jeremy


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Old 09-19-2006, 08:52 PM
jim graham jim graham is offline
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I've been working with CF sence the mid 60's in the aircraft industry and the last two years as knife handles. the only time you'll get any frying or flaking is during the drilling or sawing process and this can be avoided by using the right speed and feed with the proper tools.

A spade bit should be used to drill CF and when its not available you should us a back up board to prevent splintering. Drilling and sawing you should us 3200 speed. A bi metal
in the saw is really no advantage. Save your money and just use your wood band saw.

In a lot of my profiling I use a high speed plunge rotor which has performed better than band sawing. Leaves a cleaner edge and is most econumical.
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Old 10-17-2006, 07:42 PM
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What exactly is a "high speed plunge rotor". Jeremy ?

Joe

Excuse me , the question should have been directed to Jim.

Last edited by joe sangster; 10-17-2006 at 07:44 PM.
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:01 AM
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Talking

Well, I guess I must have asked a stupid question. Can anyone tell me what a "high speed rotor plunger is & how it is used ?

Thanks,
Joe

Make that a " high speed plunge rotor "

Last edited by joe sangster; 10-24-2006 at 09:03 AM.
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:30 AM
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Router, rotor, potayto, potahto... its all good.


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Old 10-24-2006, 09:48 PM
jim graham jim graham is offline
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Joe,

Sorry for the delay on your ans. Been off site for awhile.

A plunge router is a high speed motor, 20,000 to 25,000 RPM, Willl chuck a high speed steel or carbide cutter. Simaluar to a port a cable wood router used to do trim work such as radius edges except you can use both to use a cutter that you can plunge in the field of the material and do a scroll cut. Now there making them a lot smaller then the old port a cable model we're use to. Like a 1/4 horse die grinder motor. Check out Drimel or Sears
both have a good version of a plunge router.

If I can be of any help future on this PM me and I will get back faster.

Thanks for the question and I hope I was able to help, Jim
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Old 10-25-2006, 09:11 AM
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Jim, thanks for your reply. Not being a woodworker & never having used a router , I was completely baffled. If I get the chance, I'll have to try one. One of my woodworking friends just acquired a Dremel router . I'll have to check it out.

Joe
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