MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions > The Newbies Arena

The Newbies Arena New to Knife Making? Here's all the help you need ...

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-10-2017, 05:07 PM
Naphtali Naphtali is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 26
Cocobolo as fixed-blade knife handle?

Comparing cocobolo with Diamondwood® and/or Pakkawood® fixed-blade knife handles, how "use resistant" is the wood? I guess a similar question is: How much routine maintenance does cocobolo require per year, and what does "routine maintenance" include for cocobolo knife handles?


__________________
When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-10-2017, 05:23 PM
epicfail48 epicfail48 is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Springfield Mo
Posts: 50
Well, cocobolo is pretty much the wood of choice for kitchen knives, if that tells you anything.

Seriously, it's amazing stuff. Dense, naturally oily so it resistance rot extremely well, and looks bloody amazing. Try some, you'll like it
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-10-2017, 06:31 PM
Naphtali Naphtali is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Well, cocobolo is pretty much the wood of choice for kitchen knives, if that tells you anything.

Seriously, it's amazing stuff. Dense, naturally oily so it resistance rot extremely well, and looks bloody amazing. Try some, you'll like it
Many thanks.


__________________
When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. Jonathan Swift
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-10-2017, 06:36 PM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,647
Wear your respirator and long sleeve shirts with cocobolo, the dust is highly toxic. Although many people work with cocobolo for years with no obvious reaction others react to it and other tropical woods very quickly. The effect is cumulative, it took me about 10 years of occasional use to become sensitized to it. Once it happened I found I could no longer even stand to be in the same room with a vintage rosewood guitar that I owned. Hopefully, you won't experience this sort of thing but don't take chances with it....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-10-2017, 08:53 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Now live in Las Cruces NM.
Posts: 973
Lance, I wanted to do your Morseth with cocobolo, it is a beautiful wood and after it has been sealed it's practically as good as stabilized for the reasons stated above. It is my wood of choice, it and ironwood. A simple seal with thinned down epoxy will seal both and they will soak into any pores that are left. I have to add a spacer to your Morseth by the way as the short threads won't quite let the threaded brass plug seat below the back of the knife.
I have made more than a few kitchen Chef's Knives from cocobolo. It is an aggravating wood to some, but it doesn't bother me, but with all woods I wear a HEPA filter respirator. I learned a long time ago it is unhealthy to breath the dust from the belt and from the material being ground. My brother can't tolerate cocobolo or quite a few woods, he's a metal worker.LOL
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-11-2017, 03:08 AM
epicfail48 epicfail48 is offline
Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Springfield Mo
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
Wear your respirator and long sleeve shirts with cocobolo, the dust is highly toxic. Although many people work with cocobolo for years with no obvious reaction others react to it and other tropical woods very quickly. The effect is cumulative, it took me about 10 years of occasional use to become sensitized to it. Once it happened I found I could no longer even stand to be in the same room with a vintage rosewood guitar that I owned. Hopefully, you won't experience this sort of thing but don't take chances with it....
A very, very important thing to remember, but this advise is in no way limited to cocobolo. Really you should be wearing a respirator when working any wood, wood dust isn't something that belongs in your lungs, but most oily or tropical woods are known as sensitizers, even if they aren't flat out toxic. With repeated exposure your body starts to develop a reaction to them, and it gets worse.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-11-2017, 05:29 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: putnam county NY ....about 45 mins north of new york city
Posts: 1,332
EVEN BETTER WEAR YOUR MASK ALL THE TIME!!! You don't want to breath any of that stuff in wether its steel, titanium, brass, wood , carbon fiber ect.... The only time I don't put my mask on is if it is something super quick like shortening a pair of screw that takes 10 seconds so I don't bother always wear it ...some materials can effect you very very quickly of just breathing it in for a short amount of time other materials take 10+ years to do its thing but you don't want to find out 10 years from now that you have lung cancer from not using a mask .....it only takes 10 seconds to put on.........On the topic Ray in one of your videos you showed your mask that you said they don't make any more it had a clip in the front to drop the mask down. Well 3m is making them again saw it in home depot and grabed it and love it makes things like talking to people when they interrupt me much easier....

That being said cocobolo is the only NON stabilized wood I have ever used....I only use wood 20% of the time so I aint a expert but I think it is to oily to stabilize (again could be wrong on that) I do like the look its a real good looking wood and honestly I used it twice on knives that I did very early on in my knife making and they just sit in a draw (one isn't even sharpened or even a secondary bevel for that) I do think if I did it again and it would be used a lot I would seal it like jim had said either thinned out epoxy or even a CA glue and just spread it around let it dry and hit it lightly with a high grit sand paper....
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:56 PM
M&J's Avatar
M&J M&J is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: So. Cal
Posts: 216
Just to tag in that getting the dust cleaned from your shop will be good too. The Mrs. has a host of typical allergies and one visit to a makers shop he'd worked one of the rosewood family a few days earlier. He'd "cleaned" anticipating our visit too. He had not worked at all that day so the air was basically still/settled. She had been in there maybe 5 minutes tops and she felt her allergies coming on, itchy eyes, coughing, etc. Took lots of antihistamine to level her reactions off.

My suggestion would be a cartridge respirator for the improved facial seal. At times I double up with an organic vapor cartridge and P100 pre-filter.

Over the years I've known many that have developed a severe reaction and at the onset this is a trip to the ER room. Be safe.


__________________
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-14-2017, 07:51 AM
Crex's Avatar
Crex Crex is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Acworth, GA and/or Hanging Dog, NC
Posts: 3,388
To answer the original question....if the knife is treated as a knife should be, you will not live long enough to know how well the coccobolo handle will hold up. This can actually be said about a lot of totally natural handle materials that have not been stabilized. Never could understand the actual need for a handle to outlast a blade.
That being said, I do understand why many prefer to use synthetics and stabilized material. It's ok for them, I just prefer not to unless a customer requests such. Just doesn't go with my preferred styling.


__________________
Carl Rechsteiner, Bladesmith
Georgia Custom Knifemakers Guild, Charter Member
Knifemakers Guild, voting member
Registered Master Artist - GA Council for the Arts
C Rex Custom Knives

Blade Show Table 5-J
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-17-2017, 08:45 AM
WNC Goater WNC Goater is offline
Skilled
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: NC Mountains
Posts: 465
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crex View Post
To answer the original question....if the knife is treated as a knife should be, you will not live long enough to know how well the coccobolo handle will hold up. This can actually be said about a lot of totally natural handle materials that have not been stabilized. Never could understand the actual need for a handle to outlast a blade.
That being said, I do understand why many prefer to use synthetics and stabilized material. It's ok for them, I just prefer not to unless a customer requests such. Just doesn't go with my preferred styling.

+1 Thank you!


__________________
Find me on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/gpopecustomknives/

Gloria In Excelsis Deo!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bee, blade, brass, dust, fixed, flat, handle, handles, ironwood, kitchen, kitchen knives, knife, knife handle, knife handles, knife making, knives, made, material, question, rosewood, simple, vintage, wood, woods


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How should I go about attaching a .50 cal BMG shell as a handle to a knife blade? EliW0894 The Newbies Arena 12 02-20-2015 06:58 AM
fixe blade 1075, cocobolo and his case. from france cyssou38 The Newbies Arena 4 10-03-2014 03:19 PM
Making the handle and finishing a fixed blade knife kit Don Robinson Knife Making Courses & Class Schedule 5 04-09-2008 10:27 AM
ebay knife, my blade new handle - ???? SVanderkolff Knife Making Discussions 6 11-13-2006 02:54 PM
Handle for a Helle knife blade? Flint Kemper The Newbies Arena 1 06-26-2005 08:40 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:42 AM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
CKK Industries, Inc. • All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved