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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 10-15-2003, 09:24 PM
Brad Brad is offline
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Wood for handle

I'm just wondering which of these woods you like most and why.
This is possibly for an small old-style bowie knife, (partial tang, brass bolster and guard), and just to gather folk's opinions in general.
AMARANTH (PURPLE HEART)
BLACK PALM
COCOBOLO
CORKWOOD AUSTRALIAN
EBONY (GABOON)
EBONY (MACASSAR GOLDEN)
KINGWOOD (PARA)
MAPLE (CANADIAN CURLY)
MAPLE (BIRDSEYE)
MESQUITE
OLIVEWOOD
BLOODWOOD
BOCOTE (CORDIA BARISINA)
BOIS D?ARC (OSAGE ORANGE, HEDGE, etc.)
ROSEWOOD (EAST INDIAN)
ROSEWOOD (BOLIVIAN)
TULIP
WESTERN WALNUT
ZEBRA
ZIRICOTE
Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 10-15-2003, 09:33 PM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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IM QUITE PARTIAL TO AFRICAN BLACKWOOD OR ANY OF THE HIGHGRADE BURLS ESPECIALY IF STABILIZED
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  #3  
Old 10-15-2003, 10:05 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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I agree. Most any high quality piece of those woods would be fine if stabilized. Some, like Cocobolo cannot be effectively stabilized so I don't put them on using knives.

If I'm gonna use a wood handled knife, it has to be stabilized....


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  #4  
Old 10-15-2003, 10:42 PM
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Chris Daigle Chris Daigle is offline
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I'm a sucker for a nicely figured burl as well (stabilized). The burls give so much depth, it's scary. But, if it will go on a old style bowie, you may want to stick with a traditional species. Osage Orange and/or Ebony (watch for cracking!) sound like your best bet.

I've also got some old growth Olive wood that would knock your socks off in terms of its contrast.

Chris
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  #5  
Old 10-17-2003, 05:26 PM
Brad Brad is offline
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Question Stabilization

The wood I was going to use (tulipwood or perhaps ebony) d## not say anyting about being stabilized, but they d## say "use sealer". So will using sealer be sufficient or is there a way to stabilize them at home?
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  #6  
Old 10-17-2003, 05:33 PM
MSoerensen MSoerensen is offline
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in the scandinavian part of the world there have been made knives for a very long time and first this year i saw some one selling stabilized wood at a knife show. so it would be possible to use wood that is not stabilized for knives.


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  #7  
Old 10-17-2003, 07:23 PM
Frank J Warner Frank J Warner is offline
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Quote:
So will using sealer be sufficient or is there a way to stabilize them at home?
Coming from a woodworking background I can tell you that sanding sealer won't work. Cabinetmakers build tolerances into their pieces so the wood can shrink or swell with minor changes in hum##ity. Sanding sealer and many cabinet finishes are designed to breath with the wood. Knives generally are expected to survive much harsher conditions than sanding sealer or other wood finishes can handle.

Wood used for knife handles must withstand environmental changes that few other wooden implements do. Sweaty palms, blood, salt water, hot soapy water, hot or dry conditions, freezing, etc. So the wood absolutely must be stabilized so it can't shrink, swell, check or split. Stabilized wood has the general consistency and density of plastic or acrylic.

Check the search button at the top of the page. You're sure to find lots of information about stabilized (and stabilizing your own) wood.

-Frank J Warner


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  #8  
Old 10-18-2003, 10:06 PM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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GET A CANNING JAR AND PUT YOUR SCALES IN IT THEN COVER WITH MINWAX WOOD HARDENER.PLACE JAR WITH L## ON BUT NOT!!!TIGHTENED.IT MUST BE LOOSE TO ALLOW SOME VENTING WHILE HEATING BUT THE L## LIMITS THE VAPORS.PUT JAR IN A LARGE POT FILLED WITH JUST ENOUGH WATER TO COME UP TO ABOUT 1/2 INCH BELOW THE TOP.DO THIS OUTS##E OR IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA ON A HOTPLATE.NOT GAS.BRING WATER TO 200 DEGREES AND LET THE JAR REST IN IT UNTIL IT COMES UP TO TEMP.ABOUT FIVE TO TEN MINUTES FOR A QUART SIZED JAR.WHEN THE JAR IS UP TO TEMP REMOVE THE JAR AND TIGHTEN THE L##.AS THE JAR COOLS A VACUUM WILL BE CREATED.ALLOW THE WOOD TO STAY IN THE JAR FOR TWO WEEKS.REMOVE AND LET SIT.NOW YOU HAVE STABILZED WOOD WITHOUT HAVING TO BUY A VACUUM SETUP
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  #9  
Old 10-18-2003, 10:59 PM
Brad Brad is offline
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Kewl

Nice ##ea McAhron - Hey I dec##ed to use F##dleback maple
no gas, eh? s'pose if you use gas you get F##dleback Flambe with a delicious minwax sauce! I do have acess to a vacuum sealer "Foodvac 110" or something. It has a big plastic vacuum can that hold a vacuum. Would that work with the same time involved? Will the minwax melt the plastic??
SO MANY QUESTIONS!
If you have any info it would be appreciated. Thanks.
-Brad
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  #10  
Old 10-19-2003, 08:42 PM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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MANY PEOPLE USE JUST SUCH A DEVICE.WORKS WELL.ALOT OF PEOPLE PUT A SECOND JAR IN LINE TO CATCH ANY FOAM AND STUFF.THERE ARE PICTURES IN THE ARCHIVE.USE THE SEARCH FEATURE.0]
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  #11  
Old 10-22-2003, 01:48 PM
Brad Brad is offline
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Thanks

Thanks a lot
LAST QUESTION:
Should I stabilize before or after I have the general shape of the handle carved?
Thanks
-Brad
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  #12  
Old 10-22-2003, 06:43 PM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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do it before,its not that much harder to work and you may get slight shrinkage or warping
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  #13  
Old 10-24-2003, 06:04 PM
Brad Brad is offline
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Wink

Thanks everybody!
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