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The Outpost This forum is dedicated to all who share a love for, and a desire to make good knives, and have fun doing it. We represent a diverse group of smiths and knifemakers who bring numerous methods to their craft.

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  #1  
Old 06-27-2006, 09:00 PM
toddhill toddhill is offline
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raise that hammer!

Here's my first Mexican raising hammer. After watching Tai use his and trying it out myself, I just had to have one. It's from a thick chunk of 5160. I have some even thicker pieces that I plan on making more with. I also have some big ball peins I want to forge down. My handle sucks, but I'm not finished with it yet. The string wrapping is because I screwed up and the handle started splitting from driving in the wedge.





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Old 06-27-2006, 09:09 PM
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Blaine Whitney Blaine Whitney is offline
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I Want One!


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Old 06-27-2006, 09:51 PM
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Woodchuck Forge Woodchuck Forge is offline
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Nice. I just had a guy give me a bunch of really thick leaf springs off a dump truck. I don't think I want to trust them on a knife but I may try this. I've been wanting to try one of these for a while now.

Chuck


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Old 06-27-2006, 10:49 PM
toddhill toddhill is offline
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Chuck, that's what mine was from.

Blaine, I have some pieces cut and ready to make into hammers. One inch thick, two inches wide, five and a quarter inches long. If you come out to the next FMP (or a class with Tai) and want one I'll give you one.
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Old 06-28-2006, 02:08 AM
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Todd---I like it too--now i know what to do with the spring i have..........and again thanks on the pic's -- posted a few (and only had minor learning curve stress).
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Old 06-28-2006, 08:25 AM
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Cool Todd! Nice hammer!
I couldn't do what I do without that style of Mex raising hammer.
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Old 06-28-2006, 08:33 AM
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ow much of a difference between that one and a common straight pein?


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Old 06-28-2006, 10:25 AM
toddhill toddhill is offline
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There are a few differences I see. The first is that these have more of a face than a pein does. Also there isn't much of an angle leading up to the face like there is on a regular pein. These are two major differences. I've been trying to do with my pein hammers what Tai does with the Mexican, but with limited success. It doesn't work nearly as well and requires more cleanup (filing, etc.).
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Old 06-28-2006, 12:44 PM
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The advantages revolved around the geometry of the hammers. Basically, it's the longer distance from the hammer face to the handle, an "L" shape, as opposed to the stubby western style cross peens. Both types are good for different things. The longer nosed hammers have a smaller face with more weight and back up mass behind the face. This allows better and more efficient penetration into the metal. It leaves a deeper dent. The dents can be cleaned up with the broader flat faced hammers. With the dents there is less resistance to broad flat faced hammers, less surface contact and shock. The metal moves more efficiently. The metal is worked by a process of denting and flattening. The longer nose also gives more clearance from the hot metal, allows you to get into tight places, come straigth down and clear the tongs with your hand. It also requires less flexing of the wrist to make contact with the metal, less shock to the metal and to the smith. Some of the other Mex hammers are essentially the same as Japanese bladesmithing hammers. They have the long nosed "L" shape, and more round or octagonal faces.

If you look at the work that the Mex copper smiths do, you'll see why I became so interested in their hammers.
http://www.mexconnect.com/MEX/jrose/...radecobre.html
If you do a Google search for "The Santa Clara Coppersmtihs" you can see more of their work.
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