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Historical Inspiration This forum is dedicated to the discussion of historical knife design and its influence on modern custom knife work.

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  #46  
Old 04-26-2006, 01:45 PM
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The tethered style is still popular in the northern part of Europe. Not those things can't be improved on, but you got to take a serious look at something that's been around a long time and still unchanged. I love the sheath styling they do over there but most people on this side of the pond don't care for it or complain about the lack of guards on the blades.

Jim


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  #47  
Old 04-26-2006, 03:53 PM
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Has anyone here ever USED the guard for anything on a blade.
I mean, we always hear theories as to why guards are there, or necessary, but I don't think they're based in truth.

In fact, the guard gets int eh way of cutting on a flat surface with most of the blade. I prefer something more kitchen knife like for most things where I won't likely be encountering other sharp things against my blade in close quarters, like trapping or grappling range.

In that case, however, I have my precious.
Precious is 1/4 inch thick with fat, integral, slotted guards.
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  #48  
Old 04-26-2006, 04:16 PM
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The hunters I work with always go on about the handle becoming slippery with blood (and other things) and you hand can slip right over the front onto the edge. Kitchen work can be as messy and I've never had a knife slip in my hand. I guess it falls down to what someone else around here said "It's a knife. It's sharp. Be careful."

Now on the cosmetic level, guards can add a lot of look. Love sub-hilt designs.

Jim


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  #49  
Old 04-26-2006, 04:21 PM
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J.Arthur Loose J.Arthur Loose is offline
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The Pukko has a swivelly hanger specifically so that it swings out of the way as you hunt / herd in the underbrush of Finland... that's why the tip of the sheath traditionally curves to the back, so that it does not catch on any branches. They're pretty perfectly realized.

I'm sure we could refine the Viking double belt loop holder, but a well-preserved example would doubtless be informative.


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  #50  
Old 12-12-2015, 04:41 PM
Amrik.Singh Amrik.Singh is offline
 
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The fact that the name seax ceased abruptly to be used when tribal germanic society ended and was replaced by feudal christian states ,and the fact that nearly every found seaxes had a hiden tang and were carry near horizontal in front tell me that the seax was a cultural type of dagger that every freemen carrie as a tribal warrior . A crudly made seax was affordable even for the poorest tribesmen because it was also used as utility knife. Later in Germany the nobility and men at arm were alone permitted to carrie a sword ,a falshion or a nini-sword like dagger ,others , farmers ,artisans were allowed to carry a "messer" for defence .The only difference was purely cultural : In their mind a simple peasant knife is full tang riveted ,a warrior weapon have a swordlike hiden tang , there is no practical reason.
I did try different ways to draw a knife in case of emergency : The front cross horizontal as the seax is by far the fastest.
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  #51  
Old 12-17-2015, 04:40 PM
Amrik.Singh Amrik.Singh is offline
 
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There are many types of seax but one can try to give a definition because there are many common types of later knives that will qualify perfectly to be called a seax if it was not for their name , form of the sheath , the way to carry and the cultural meaning and fashion . Most Bowie's ,falshions and messers have a gard that is often seen as an improvement of the original design. The difference between hilt with riveted plaketteand hidden tang do not have any more much sociall meaning .
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blade, bowie, case, chris, common, dagger, design, fixed blade, forge, full tang, germany, hidden, hidden tang, knife, knife making, knives, made, seax, sheath, simple, tang, tribal, utility


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