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The Newbies Arena New to Knife Making? Here's all the help you need ...

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  #16  
Old 06-01-2017, 07:44 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmccustomknives View Post
I didn't see if you had an anvil or plan on forging your blades, if you don't have an anvil and plan on forging find a Fisher anvil since you live in a neighborhood. The Fisher is a quiet anvil, you won't upset the neighbors like you will will other, more noisy ones.
While this is true about Fishers, almost all anvils can be quieted down to the same level with just a little effort. So don't let that be a deal breaker. Things you can do: 2 - 3 loose wraps of logging chain around the waist (of the anvil), big old school speaker magnets on the sides, don't mount on one of those metal tri or quad leg metal stands. They are extremely annoyingly loud - use 4x4 or larger PT lumber bolted together so that they stand on end for a stump....or cut a stump. Wood will dampen the vibration which = noise when you strike the anvil.

I have one 120# anvil that is an unmarked American made, extremely good rebound. However it is a farrier's anvil which are notoriously louder due to the longer horn and tail with a thinner waist. I found a more unconventional way to dampen it out by drilling/tapping a 1/4x20 hole on the under side of the horn half way out. Took a two pound section of CI sash weight which I drilled/tapped the same and then mounted directly below the horn with about 1" of gap between horn and weight. Works just like one of those bow (archery) stabilizers. Killed the ring and is one of my quietest anvils. She's my favorite travel/demo anvil, a real workhorse.


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  #17  
Old 06-01-2017, 02:54 PM
WNC Goater WNC Goater is offline
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I recently found a 103# Columbian cast steel anvil. The thing rings like a church bell. Having neighbors close by, I made a heavy timber stand with a recess in the center. In that I put sand and sit the anvil on top. This quietens it down to a much quieter ring. Putting a tool magnet under the heel silences any ring. It will still ring when struck on the horn but not obnoxiously loud.





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  #18  
Old 06-01-2017, 02:58 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Hey guys....Finally some rest from driving to the show....So you guys know I don't forge much and still have my rail track anvil. I am curious tho...how does a magnet effect the ring?
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  #19  
Old 06-01-2017, 03:39 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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It's not the magnetism that does it, it's the additional lump of metal placed in the right spot. Read CREX's last comment where he did the same thing with another lump of metal but without magnetism ...


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  #20  
Old 06-01-2017, 04:00 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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I don't think he wants to forge yet, just heat treat.


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  #21  
Old 06-01-2017, 04:07 PM
Sawdusthappy Sawdusthappy is offline
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Right now I want to just heat treat. Butbwhen I get into a bigger shop next year I really want to learn to forge. I am thursty for information so all of this is extremely useful information! I really do want to thank you all for the wealth of information. I cang wait for the 1084 steel to arrive on Monday & for Ray's DVD to arrive in the mail! I am very excited to start making some knives!
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  #22  
Old 06-01-2017, 06:44 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Well happy grinding to you!

Dusty it is a great hobby I have been doing since 1992. I have learned a lot since. Even with O1 tool steel, a metal I thought I knew very well, I have learned much more about it from guys here. It is a great steel, but you need an oven to do it properly, but for a newbie it would be better in a forge than 1095 even though you can't bring out its best, but it is more forgiving.

The 1084 you ordered will be great for your first excursions into HTing hi-carbon steel. You will find what seems to be miniscule amounts of certain elements will make a steel superior to others with the proper HT. O1 is one of those and a fave of mine.

Go to Alpha Knife Supply and look at the huge variety of steels that can be made into great working knives. Don't go crazy thinking you can do them all. LOL There are some guys here who won't touch certain steels. Myself included.
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  #23  
Old 06-02-2017, 10:55 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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OK I thought you guys ment it was the magnetism that changed the ring that's why I didn't understand.....SAWDUST you will learn a lot from this forum. Yeh some stuff I leanred by trial and error and experience...other than that the vasto majority of what I know now came from the men on this forum. When you start heat treating remember to do the tests and break the blades to see the results. Get that done early on before you put a lot of effort into finishing a knife that the heat treat my be lacking.
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  #24  
Old 06-02-2017, 06:38 PM
Sawdusthappy Sawdusthappy is offline
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Awesome! I have been reading alot and hoping to make a trip to the book store and pick uo some books on the craft. I am hoping to do it all myself ad I think the trial and error will be part of the fun. I am still learning alot about grain sizes and trying to figure it all out. I figure I will do the file test to try testing heat treat. Once I think I know enough about grain size, then I am hoping to break a knife and see how I did. Or should I break a knife first?
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  #25  
Old 06-02-2017, 06:59 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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You might want to read the Sticky thread called "BEFORE You Heat Treat Your First Knife" .

The file test is subjective, you can skate a file across a blade - which shows that the blade is hard - but it could still have lousy grain. Hardness isn't everything. You won't know much of anything about the grain until you break the blade.

Start with coupons and heat treat those. A coupon is simply a piece of blade steel 2" or 3" inches long with a notch cut into each side so that it resembles an hour glass. Faster and easier to make than a blade and cheaper too. When you think the grain is good then make a blade, test it hard, and then break it. Probably have to adjust your HT and try again but you should be close ...


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  #26  
Old 06-02-2017, 06:59 PM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Hey saw dust check your "user cp and private message" Just a welcome note
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  #27  
Old 06-02-2017, 09:31 PM
Sawdusthappy Sawdusthappy is offline
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Thank you for the explanation about coupons! I did not know what that was. Let me build your forge and we will definetly start there! I would feel alot better makjng and breaking a few coupons than a knife that took me. Few evenings to get ready for heat treating.
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