MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions

Knife Making Discussions A place to discuss issues related to all aspects of the custom knifemaking community.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #46  
Old 01-17-2006, 07:33 AM
ranger1's Avatar
ranger1 ranger1 is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lexington,NC
Posts: 2,414
That is true the KMG will also take all the bader attachments.Bader has many attachments other than the small wheel.My big decideing factor was direct drive over belt drive.I have never heard a complaint about the bader or the KMG,from all I can find the Coote is not a bad road to travel.


__________________
Andy Sharpe
I ruin perfectly good steel!!
www.sharpeknives.com
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 01-17-2006, 06:34 PM
Josh O Mason's Avatar
Josh O Mason Josh O Mason is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 112
Send a message via Yahoo to Josh O Mason
The coote grinder is really catching my eye now....about the same price as the griz, and looks like a much better machine.

I really like the little 2X48 machine... would you guys reccomend that one, or go ahead and think about the 2X72? I plan on flat grinding my blades.

I don't like all this "such and such not included" business. What's this about a pulley not included?
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 01-17-2006, 09:35 PM
ranger1's Avatar
ranger1 ranger1 is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Lexington,NC
Posts: 2,414
The pully that runs the grinder is sold seperatly.so you will need a pully for the grinder,a pully for the motor,and a motor.A friend of mine has a coote,it grinds nice I would recamend 72" with the 8" contact wheel.If you ever decide to hollow grind the 8"works great.


__________________
Andy Sharpe
I ruin perfectly good steel!!
www.sharpeknives.com
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 01-17-2006, 10:53 PM
J.Arthur Loose's Avatar
J.Arthur Loose J.Arthur Loose is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vermont
Posts: 1,403
Send a message via AIM to J.Arthur Loose Send a message via Yahoo to J.Arthur Loose
At 2x48 you aren't being as efficient with your belts as you are at 2x72... you'll go through them quicker because there is less grit passing along the same circle... supposedly, at 2x72 you get closer to the best point of price vs amount of belt / grit and amount of work getting done. At least according to a Bader salesman I talked to at a show once.


__________________






jloose.com

Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 01-18-2006, 05:38 AM
Andrew Garrett's Avatar
Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Nampa, Idaho
Posts: 3,579
Yea, I use a 2 x 48 and my biggest complaint is the speed at which I can wear out a belt. It's not a problem with the good belts but the cheap A/O belts go quick. The flip side is the a cheap 2 x 48 belt only costs about a dollar! The pricey ones, about $3.50.


__________________
Andy Garrett
https://www.facebook.com/GarrettKnives?ref=hl
Charter Member - Kansas Custom Knifemaker's Association
www.kansasknives.org

"Drawing your knife from its sheath and using it in the presence of others should be an event complete with oos, ahhs, and questions."
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 01-18-2006, 06:22 PM
Josh O Mason's Avatar
Josh O Mason Josh O Mason is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 112
Send a message via Yahoo to Josh O Mason
Fellas....I think I'm gonna go with the coote 2X72.

better than the grizzly for about as much money, and wont bust my wallet up like the KMG.

Still not real sure how to come up with/attach the other parts and stuff... Will they send me some info and a parts list or something? That website is not very clear to me.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 01-18-2006, 06:52 PM
Andrew Garrett's Avatar
Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Nampa, Idaho
Posts: 3,579
A fine machine. I'm sure you'll love it. I almost went with the Coote when I was wearing your shoes. Alas, I settled on the Multitool. Viva la' differance!


__________________
Andy Garrett
https://www.facebook.com/GarrettKnives?ref=hl
Charter Member - Kansas Custom Knifemaker's Association
www.kansasknives.org

"Drawing your knife from its sheath and using it in the presence of others should be an event complete with oos, ahhs, and questions."
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 01-18-2006, 07:57 PM
J.Arthur Loose's Avatar
J.Arthur Loose J.Arthur Loose is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Vermont
Posts: 1,403
Send a message via AIM to J.Arthur Loose Send a message via Yahoo to J.Arthur Loose
Josh,

You could call them and ask for a brochure- when I ordered mine they didn't even have a website...

Bolt it down tight... put your motor on a good hinge for weight on the belt... and keep yer fingers outta there.


__________________






jloose.com

Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 01-18-2006, 09:20 PM
tmickley's Avatar
tmickley tmickley is offline
Registered
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: North Mankato, MN
Posts: 0
When I started out in knife making I bought a Grizzly. I wasn't entirely sure knife making was going to do it for me and I wanted try it cheaper than whole hog with a KMG. I bought the grizzly and used it for a year and made several knives. I still use it on every single knife but as a two wheel buffer now instead of a grinder. Once I was convinced knife making would be something I wanted to stick with and get good at with great tools, I went with a variable speed KMG. Some say this is a waste of money, that I should have just gone to the KMG (I had money, I just didn't have the commitment yet) and I would have saved all that money I spent on the Grizz. But the deal is, I still don't feel I wasted a dime. I have a great buffer (and back up grinder) in the Grizz and I was able to test the waters of knife making on my own terms. I understand the value of great quality vs economy but some times a budget has to be part of the equation.

Every one has different reasons for getting into knife making and every one probably has a different plan to accomplish that. If I had to do it all over, I would 'leg into' knife making the same way. I'm cautious that way.

Andrew used a skeet shooting analogy. I shot trap quite a bit so I'll use that as an analogy. I started with an 870, as a capable shooter. OK scores, I was having fun. League night was more about the beer and socialising than serious shooting. My interest picked up and I started getting more serious and competitive. I stepped up to a Browning over/under Lightening. Better equipment, better scores. When I went nuts for trap shooting and started serious competitive shooting, I picked up a Perazzi MX-7 and shot several 100 straights. Now there are plenty of guys that could shoot 100 straight with an old 870 Remington. I couldn't. I got close with the Browning but I needed the better equipment to move up in competitive shooting just like I need the better equipment in knife making for that extra edge.

There is no reason every knife maker should have a KMG, even the serious ones. They may not need it. They may not want it - yet. I personally believe a KMG is the best grinder out there. Others believe a Bader is, some their Hardcore and some their Coote grinder and they are all right.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 01-19-2006, 01:20 AM
Josh O Mason's Avatar
Josh O Mason Josh O Mason is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 112
Send a message via Yahoo to Josh O Mason
Thanks so much guys for your responses. I have no idea why I never even considered the Coote grinder. The thing looks like a #### tank. I think I'll get some more info, and place my order.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 01-19-2006, 03:59 AM
hammerdownnow's Avatar
hammerdownnow hammerdownnow is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Avon Lake, Ohio
Posts: 4,340
Send a message via Yahoo to hammerdownnow
Very cool thread. When ever I stick my nose into one of these conversations, it leads me to go off searching. This time I poked around about Kalamzoo. I did not know Kalamazoo offered a 2x72 with or without a motor. I was also surprized to see a square wheel offered. Anyone have a link to a dealer with the prices?
kalamazoo belt grinders


__________________
"Many are chosen, but few are Pict"
"The doer alone, learneth" NT Neo-Devo
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 01-19-2006, 07:17 AM
hammerdownnow's Avatar
hammerdownnow hammerdownnow is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Avon Lake, Ohio
Posts: 4,340
Send a message via Yahoo to hammerdownnow
One of my grinders is an old Engelberg 2x48. Engelberg was bought out by Porter Cable in the 40's. The top wheel was worn so thin it was like paper and I pushed my finger right thru it. I replaced it with a Frink 2" contact wheel. (No chatter when I am doing tight contours.) It looks very similar to the Coote. I imagine it works about the same. It is aww-ite. It is ok. I can grind a knife on it. Can I trust it not to hicup and screw me up and ruin a blade for me? No. I was thinking about tearing it down, shimming it all up tight and adding a third wheel and some slowdown pullies just to for a project to see if I could make it run super true. Its problems may be due to the mileage on it as I think about it, and a new Coote with fresh bearings may run totally different. So what am I trying to say? I don't know. Somebody hit me with one of these.


__________________
"Many are chosen, but few are Pict"
"The doer alone, learneth" NT Neo-Devo
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 01-19-2006, 08:42 AM
TexasJack's Avatar
TexasJack TexasJack is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 2,822
I have a Grizzly and, for me, its the appropriate machine for the money. Reading Tracy's post, I have to agree with him 100%. In fact, I think that's the best description of what level of equipment to buy that I ever seen, and you could apply it to any equipment, not just a grinder.

As for the 72" vs 48" lengths, it's not just the amount of grit that makes the difference. I did some consulting years ago for a company that makes sandpaper. The "killer" for sandpaper is heat. The longer belt allows heat dissipation and keeps the adhesive from breaking down as quickly. The grit is harder than steel, so it's not wearing down; it's being stripped off as the adhesive goes.


__________________
God bless Texas! Now let's secede!!
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 01-19-2006, 11:32 AM
cwp's Avatar
cwp cwp is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Emmett, Idaho
Posts: 1,178
I agree, Tracy gave a great breakdown. I was a little different in that I knew I was hooked by the time I bought the grizzly, just thought it would work well, and I didn't know how much grinding I would end up doing. I was 100% convinced my grizzly was purring like a kitten, thing didn't loose track, etc. Figured I would move to a KMG once I hit the point of being good enough to actually feel good selling knives (up to this point I have done a couple KITH, and given a few to family, but I am still looking for a level from myself before I will sell). Anyway, being convinced the grizzly was running like a dream, I had no reason to upgrade right away. Went to the class, used a KMG and a Wilson, and I had my reason.

If you're not sure this hobby is for you, Tracy has good advice. If you are already addicted, start thinking about good equipment.

Tracy, I would be very happy with a Browning over/under I shoot a winchester 1300 most of the time, and every now and then take my 9410 out to shoot skeet with. But I must say, I do lust after a good over/under (for that matter, I also want a good side by side).

--Carl


__________________
--Carl
N-T Porkin' Pig Price

?? KN Auctions to help a member in need and score a GREAT deal! ??
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 01-19-2006, 03:27 PM
Andrew Garrett's Avatar
Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Nampa, Idaho
Posts: 3,579
As always, Tracy breaks it down to the basics and makes us see the point the way we ought to. If only one machine was worth owning, there would be only one design and one manufacturer. Likewise, those machines would make only one kind of knife and pretty soon, there would be only one knifemaker.

Like Carl, I new very early (3 pages into Boye's book) that I was hooked. However, money being wat it is, and after this ritualistic self-torture that all newbies seem to go threw here on the forums, I went with a quality machine that I could afford.

If the day comes that I want a KMG or a Bader or a Burr King, I'll buy one. And, I won't consider my Multitool to be wasted money. It will still do a fair amount of work in the shaping of handles and hogging. Just go on a tour of some big-name maker's shops and you'll see as many as a half dozen working grinders. So, doing the sep-by-step method has its virtues!


__________________
Andy Garrett
https://www.facebook.com/GarrettKnives?ref=hl
Charter Member - Kansas Custom Knifemaker's Association
www.kansasknives.org

"Drawing your knife from its sheath and using it in the presence of others should be an event complete with oos, ahhs, and questions."
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bee, belt, belt sander, blade, buffer, forge, forging, grinder, knife, knife making, knives, making, motor, sander


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:47 PM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved