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The Sheath/Holster Makers Forum This is the place to discuss all forms of sheath and holster making.

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  #46  
Old 06-20-2004, 06:31 PM
DC KNIVES DC KNIVES is offline
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Chuck Burrows
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Curt - I've found the best thing for mixing up my wax is a crock pot - no open flame and no real muss and fuss, plus I can use it in my workshop AWAY from the kitchen.

I love to hear about these mixes. Mine is: rather than rosin I use pine/brewers pitch or pinon pine pitch (I just got six pounds - if you'd like to try some give me a shout) - makes a bit harder wax than rosin, but still plenty sticky. I tried various mixes including ones with carnuba (a component of atomicc wax I believe???) and olive oil (never was quite sure the reason for the oil), but I finally settled on one I got from an old German shoemaker - mix 60-80% pitch and the balance beeswax (the more pitch the harder and stickier it is). I use around 70% pitch normally and this is good and sticky but too much. One should burnish the thread after by pulling the through your fingers several times (if you've got old scaly ones like me ) or with a piece of leather or brown paper bag - this "sets" the wax deep into the threads fibers and will actually strengthen them. BTW - this mix smells good! (at least to me)

The great thing about using pitch is that pitch (or rosin) is that contains a natural anti-bacterial/fungal that helps keep the threads and leather from rotting.

Curt -got a question - I just pour my melted mix into old yogurt containers (about a third full) and let it cool - makes a nice using size for waxing threads so why into the cold water?


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  #47  
Old 06-20-2004, 06:33 PM
DC KNIVES DC KNIVES is offline
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cgillock
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Chuck I used the cold water because that is the way it showed in the recipe. Your recipe does look easier. I'm purt near out of coad at the moment. And would like to try your version. Never used the pine pitch. But am always willing to try new things. I believe the harder wax would be just the thing for this NC heat. I am interested in some of the pitch just let me know where to get a hold of some.

Have you ever checked out the Crispin Colloquy? A world of info on leatherwork. Are you stitching with needles or bristles? Ever use bear oil for leather conditioner. I have a source.


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  #48  
Old 06-20-2004, 06:35 PM
DC KNIVES DC KNIVES is offline
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Chuck Burrows
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Howdy Curt-
I'll send you cake of my mix made with pinon pitch (need to make some new up anyway) - if you like it then contact Max Burnett - MaxtheKnife her on CKD. With pitch the longer you cook it the harder it gets.
For Brewer's Pitch - James Townsend and Sons carries it.

Never heard of the Crispin Colloquy - is it on line?

I use needles most of the time - I only use boar bristles on delicate stuff with a curve such as hidden seams anymore. Do you have a good source for bristles? I'm out actually (thanks for the reminder) and usually get them from McPherson, but wouldn't mind having an alternate source. I've used imitation bristles (monofilimant) but it just isn't the same to me....

Yes I have used bear oil (next best patch oil to sperm oil IME) and I would love to have a decent source. It's also the best thing for making pie crusts too!


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  #49  
Old 06-20-2004, 06:36 PM
DC KNIVES DC KNIVES is offline
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A T Barr
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quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Chuck Burrows
Never heard of the Crispin Colloquy - is it on line?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



I love google. http://www.thehcc.org/cgi-bin/discus/discus.cgi

A.T.


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  #50  
Old 06-20-2004, 06:37 PM
DC KNIVES DC KNIVES is offline
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Chuck Burrows
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Thanks AT - yes I love Google too!

Here's another handwax formula from that site:

8 parts pine rock rosin
2 parts anhydrous lanolin superfine
1 part beeswax

Melt rosin first.
Add lanolin and beeswax.
Bring to a boil to clarify.
Pour into cold water.
Taffy pull.

Looks like the lanolin or oil is used to keep it "moist" (I don't seem to have a problem with my mix but....)
And from the post above pouring it into cold water and then "pulling" it must help "mix" it.

Curt - I'll ship you a chunk of my mix on Monday or whenever I head to town. Got it a little hot so it's a bit dark and may not be my best mix but it should give you a pretty good idea.


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  #51  
Old 06-25-2004, 06:44 PM
cgillock cgillock is offline
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A. T. Just noticed your are a Kentucky boy. I lived in Bowling Green all my life till moving to North Carolina about 4 years ago. And I will return someday.

Curt
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  #52  
Old 06-25-2004, 08:51 PM
A T Barr A T Barr is offline
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Originally Posted by cgillock
A. T. Just noticed your are a Kentucky boy. I lived in Bowling Green all my life till moving to North Carolina about 4 years ago. And I will return someday.

Curt
I was a Texan for 49 years, but I dearly love living in Kentucky. I don't miss those 113 degree days and over 100 degree nights I had in Texas. I really don't miss the scorpions, tarantulas, and all of those critters that like to chew on you.

It's nice to actually have 4 seasons. Not just winter and summer. But,.... I sure miss all the friends I have in Texas.

Stay Safe,

A.T.


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  #53  
Old 01-24-2006, 06:14 PM
wetdog1911 wetdog1911 is offline
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Bump

Thanks Mike!

Information overload!

Rob
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  #54  
Old 03-09-2007, 03:21 PM
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nthe10ring nthe10ring is offline
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String Wax

I was just reading some of the recepies for string wax and thought that for you folks that might want to find some ready to go, what you are making is pretty much the same stuff that I use to make Flemish Twist strings for my bows. Its tacky and a mixture of several things including beeswax and pine rosin. For the uninitiated, this is string making wax and comes in small cakes and is not the everyday variety string wax. Most of the mail order traditional archery supply houses sell it, seems the last I got was from Three Rivers Archery, and was about a buck a cake, have a bunch and havent ordered in some time. You can use this with a piece of thick white canvass to slick your edges also. I primarily make European style hunting bags but this stuff would work well for any type of sewing and edge polishing.

J Fisher
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  #55  
Old 11-20-2010, 03:55 PM
humminboid humminboid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drac View Post
Hi guys,

When I asked for an edge slicker he said that the slickers didn't come in a size big enough. He said to use a polished wood rod. Anyone have a better way? Thanks for your time,Jim
Jim:
I'm not into sheath-making big time, but I do have fun at it, and have made several, as well as holsters. I found the same to be true of my little wheel-shaped slicker. Not wide enough for several thicknesses of leather.

Having painted myself into a corner, and needing a solution in a hurry, I searched frantically through my shop, and found a pair of heavy-duty shears that I use for cutting the leather. It has a smooth plastic handle, which worked just fine for slicking the edges...the work even got a compliment from my holster-making instructor. A "field-expedient" (panic mode) solution that worked. Imagine that!

For stitching, I use my stitch spacing tool, then drill the holes with a 1/16 bit in my my drill press...I know, BARBARIAN! and use whatever thread the leather store has in stock, and it has worked just fine for my (so far) seven projects.

Last edited by humminboid; 11-20-2010 at 04:03 PM.
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  #56  
Old 11-20-2010, 06:39 PM
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CJS Knives CJS Knives is offline
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WOW you guys are sharing some great info here! i am new to the site, but am very impressed with the conversations i have seen so far.

have any of you heard of using wax to seal your sheath? i watched a guy on YouTube melt down some wax in a pot and then soak the sheath in it. he says it will completly waterproof the sheath.
here is the link to the video...

i am interested to hear what you guys think!


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  #57  
Old 11-21-2010, 02:52 PM
humminboid humminboid is offline
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Originally Posted by CJS Knives View Post
have any of you heard of using wax to seal your sheath? i watched a guy on YouTube melt down some wax in a pot and then soak the sheath in it. he says it will completly waterproof the sheath.
I talked with a guy at our local leather emporium, who was making Revolutionary War era style water bottles.

He wet and hardened the botttle's leather, using sand for his form, then did a couple of coats of melted beeswax inside, to seal the leather, and cover any left-over sand. (Gritty water...Yuk!) He seemed satisfied with the method, and beeswax is a natural product. Would probably work for knife sheaths, too.
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  #58  
Old 11-21-2010, 03:01 PM
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yeah i have heard you can do the same with beeswax. you can melt it down in a pan and soak the leather in it. there are a few other videos on YouTube where guys are doing this.

i even saw one guy use a beeswax tiolet bowl ring, says its the same stuff you would buy in a craft store.


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  #59  
Old 01-19-2011, 12:54 PM
elnav elnav is offline
 
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I have bee trying to get into making sheaths as a protective storage container for my knives instead of letting then rattle around and damaging the sharp edge. Now I see a caution against storing knives in a sheath. Some of my knives have been kept in their sheaths for a couple of decades. So far no sign of damage. Did I miss something?
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  #60  
Old 01-24-2011, 08:28 AM
cappaletti cappaletti is offline
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Hey Capt. Jeff !
really enjoyed that hot waxing video..very informative! I'm just wondering if paraffin would work in this application..just curious...

Gene
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