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The Sheath/Holster Makers Forum This is the place to discuss all forms of sheath and holster making.

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  #16  
Old 03-03-2004, 12:45 AM
E-Diddy E-Diddy is offline
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Can I dilute my dye?

I have a bottle of Fiebings dye. it smells like an alcohol based dye. It is much darker than I like. Can I dilute it with alcohol?

Drew


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  #17  
Old 03-03-2004, 07:52 AM
ABN ABN is offline
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Hello, Drew:

What you are looking for is located here:

Fiebing's Dye Solvent
http://www.tandyleather.com/prodinfo...em=16&mitem=57

However, there is another way to get a lighter finish. Try applying the dye lightly using a cotton rag (or an old T-shirt). Do not soak the rag, just put a little dye on it. The first coat will be very light, (let it dry,) and each successive coat will get it a little darker.

When I first started dyeing, I doused my leather with dye using the woolen daubers that come with Fiebing's dye. I learned quickly that the leather would absorb too much dye, and medium brown turned into almost-black.

Good luck, -Alex
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  #18  
Old 03-03-2004, 09:09 AM
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Chuck Burrows Chuck Burrows is offline
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Quote:
Can I dilute it with alcohol?
Yes and it's much cheaper than the solvent.


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  #19  
Old 03-03-2004, 02:50 PM
E-Diddy E-Diddy is offline
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Thanks a bunch. I tried applying the dye with a rag and it came out streaky and splochy, (is that a word?)

I am going to give the alcohol a try
Drew


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  #20  
Old 03-04-2004, 08:26 PM
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MtMike MtMike is offline
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Diluting the dye with alcohol works fine -- but it'll stain your lips and tongue somethin' terrible
Mike
PS: Hint -- if you're using Fiebings, their alcohol based dye is labeled "Leather Dye". "Leather Stain" is their oil based dye.


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  #21  
Old 03-04-2004, 08:37 PM
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Chuck Burrows Chuck Burrows is offline
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Quote:
if you're using Fiebings, their alcohol based dye is labeled "Leather Dye". "Leather Stain" is their oil based dye.
Actually their oil dye (it's not oil based just has oil added to the formula) is called "Professional Oil Dye". The standard dye and the one I use - hey it's cheaper and when used properly works just fine - is labeled "Leather Dye". They do make an Institutional Leather Dye which is designed for schools and such and is labeled Leather Dye but it does have the word Institutional above it.

One thing that helps keep leather from looking splotchy - yes that's a word - is to dampen the surface with water first - wet until the "color" from wetting is even with no "dry" splotches this opens the pores of the leather and you will get a more even dye spread that way - the dyed color will also be a bit lighter than if you hadn't dampened the surface first. Once dampened really SLOP on the dye until the surface is saturated - wipe off any excess and let dry until COMPLETELY dry (time will depend on humidity, leather, etc). Then wipe clean with a soft towel which removes the film of powder left on the surface of the leather. If you need/want a darker color then re-dye following the directions above.


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The beautiful sheaths created for storing the knife elevate the knife one step higher. It celebrates the knife it houses.

Last edited by Chuck Burrows; 06-12-2005 at 04:40 PM.
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  #22  
Old 03-16-2004, 04:51 PM
wildbill254 wildbill254 is offline
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Beeswax and Pitch Recipe

Chuck,

On the old shoemaker's recipe for thread wax, you mentioned 50/50 mix of beeswax to pine pitch, is that by weight or volume?

i got some pitch in from Max and was going to make some of it.

Thanks (for this and all your knowledge and information that you freely provide....i've learned more from this forum and you in particular on leather than i have in 15 years of making knives...GOD Bless)

Bill
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  #23  
Old 03-16-2004, 05:09 PM
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Chuck Burrows Chuck Burrows is offline
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Howdy Bill-
Glad to be of help - I use by volume I guess? - I just take two chunks about the same size and melt them together - stir while hot and skim off any dross on top with an old spoon. I pour it into old plastic yogurt containers - about 1/3 full and let get cold. Cut away the plastic and Voila!

If you got the "soft" wax from Max I would clean and then cook it down a while before adding the wax. You want the finished product to be fairly hard - not real gummy. At room temp you should be able to mark it with a finger nail, but shouldn't be able to dent it much with normal finger pressure. (about the same hardness as the plan beeswax)

BTW - after a while the chunk get's a bunch of cuts in it from the thread so I just remelt and remold.


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The beautiful sheaths created for storing the knife elevate the knife one step higher. It celebrates the knife it houses.

Last edited by Chuck Burrows; 03-16-2004 at 05:14 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-16-2004, 06:25 PM
wildbill254 wildbill254 is offline
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You the man.......



thanks
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  #25  
Old 03-25-2004, 06:08 PM
rebglass rebglass is offline
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eather finish "sparkles"

I just finished dying a sheath for a large camp knife. The leather is 9 oz and the dye is dark brown, from a brand new bottle from Tandy. I deglazed with mixture of one teaspoon oxallic acid in 1 pt water. The finished sheath surface has these tiny sparkles - I don't know what else to ca them. Anyone know what causes this effect?

Rebglass
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  #26  
Old 03-25-2004, 10:28 PM
Sandy Morrissey Sandy Morrissey is offline
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Rebglass---You did not indicate whether you had put a finish or sealer coat over the brown dye. Some dyes will leave a powdery residue that will appear to glisten in contrast to the dull dye coat. If you have not yet sealed the dye, rub it briskly with toweling and you will start to get a shine that indicates you are removing the residue. After this is completed you must put on a final finish or sealer and I believe your problem will be taken care of---Sandy


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  #27  
Old 03-25-2004, 10:33 PM
Sandy Morrissey Sandy Morrissey is offline
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Oxalic acid----

Rebglass----BTW oxalic acid is a bleach not a deglazer. It is still a must for removing smudges and fingerprints from leather. Sandy


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  #28  
Old 03-26-2004, 11:38 AM
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Chuck Burrows Chuck Burrows is offline
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As Sandy said oxalic is not the best deglazer - denatured alcohol, available in the paint section of hrdware stores, or acetone are best.

The sparkles may have come from the oxalic but often happen - again as Sandy after dying ALWAYS rub well with a clean cloth to remove the dye's powder residue. After rubbing if you still have some sparkles wipe down with alcohol or acetone and then redye if neccessary.


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Wild Rose Trading Co - Handcrafted Knife Sheaths



The beautiful sheaths created for storing the knife elevate the knife one step higher. It celebrates the knife it houses.
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  #29  
Old 03-26-2004, 12:32 PM
mwinans mwinans is offline
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what finish

Is there a leather finish that will not darken the leather? Everthing I've seen and used darkens. Also I just finished an Osage orange handled hunter what in your opinion is a good color for the sheath? I'll post it after some final touches.

Thanks guys I can always depend on you for a push in the right direction.

Mark
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  #30  
Old 03-26-2004, 12:54 PM
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Chuck Burrows Chuck Burrows is offline
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Howdy Mark-
All finishes will change the color slightly but Tan Kote, Bag Kote, Leather Sheen and the like will darken/color it the least amount.

Color is such a subjective subject - but here goes - I'd probably use a tan to medium brown - just depends on how much contrast you want. British Tan in fact gives an orange tan color that may just be the ticket. Expereiment - take some scraps and dye/finish them to various colors and hold them against the Osage and see what you think.


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Wild Rose Trading Co - Handcrafted Knife Sheaths



The beautiful sheaths created for storing the knife elevate the knife one step higher. It celebrates the knife it houses.
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