MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions > The Newbies Arena

The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-25-2014, 04:31 PM
Wydern Wydern is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 8
Bench grinder for around $250

So I'm looking for a decent belt grinder for around $250, and I think I may have found what I'm looking for either here:http://www.zoro.com/g/00035998/k-G13...nw_wcB&whence=
or here:http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...oqKExaW7Tw_wcB
My question is, does anyone have any experience with either of these two grinders? Right now I'm leaning towards the Kalamazoo mostly because it has many,many positive reviews(the other grinder has none at all) and a Baldor motor. Unfortunately none of the reviewers use the grinder to make knives, they use it for sharpening. I don't know if a 1/3hp motor is powerful enough for making knives or not.

However; the Dayton grinder has a 1/2hp motor(versus the Kalamazoo's 1/3hp motor) and has a 2" sanding belt and a slightly lower price. Which brings up another question: does a belt 2" in width really have that big of an advantage over a belt 1" in width? It seems to me that a 2" belt would allow you to grind slightly more blade steel at a time than a 1" belt making the machine more efficient. I know people have said that you could make a grinder youself for under $250, but I would rather spend the free time I have practicing grinds or teaching myself mistake,by mistake, how to make knives.
Any suggestions?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-25-2014, 05:50 PM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,816
QUOTE: but I would rather spend the free time I have practicing grinds or teaching myself mistake,by mistake, how to make knives.

That would be a good use of your free time. Either of those grinders would allow you to grind blades provided they were very small blades. I have a 1x42" Grizzly with a 1/2 hp motor (a model they no longer make) and it would be better than no grinder for knife making but not by much. Lots of guys get by with all sorts of grinders like 4x36" and even 1x30" but these grinders do not lend themselves to grinding metal and neither does anything with a 1" belt. They can do it, barely, but I think any grinding practice you get isn't going to be hugely helpful when you finally get a 2x72" with a minimum 1 hp motor. If there is any way to can stretch your budget to $600 I'd suggest you look at the Grizzly 2x72". Probably half of the knife makers in this country got one of those after wasting money on all the little grinders that are mostly designed for wood working. There is more than a world of difference in them.

The small grinders have weak motors and bog down very easily. Still, if you use fresh belts and a very light touch you can grind a blade. But, a 1x42" is a narrow and short belt. That means not much grinding grit on there and so they go dull very quickly which means you need more belts to make that blade. The money you save up front will get spent buying belts and wasting hours of your time (if you put any value on your time).

So, both of those grinders are quality grinders for their intended purpose but grinding blades isn't their forte. I know that not everyone can afford $600 right off the bat for a new hobby, I get that, but rather than spend $250 on a tiny grinder you might be better off money wise spending $100 on a 4x36 or similar grinder (man, it hurts to me recommend that!). Better yet, and I'm totally serious about this, buy a few high quality files, a Diston hacksaw with bi-metal blades, a good vise, and lots of sand paper. Lots of guys make knives using only those tools and save up their money to get a real grinder later. Best of all, that practice will help you later when you have a belt grinder and those tools will always be needed in your shop....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-27-2014, 10:44 PM
Wydern Wydern is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 8
[quote=Ray Rogers;472607]

Quote:
That would be a good use of your free time. Either of those grinders would allow you to grind blades provided they were very small blades. I have a 1x42" Grizzly with a 1/2 hp motor (a model they no longer make) and it would be better than no grinder for knife making but not by much. Lots of guys get by with all sorts of grinders like 4x36" and even 1x30" but these grinders do not lend themselves to grinding metal and neither does anything with a 1" belt. They can do it, barely, but I think any grinding practice you get isn't going to be hugely helpful when you finally get a 2x72" with a minimum 1 hp motor.
I quess this would apply for 2x48" belts also? I have found a few that have a 1hp motor and are a lot more affordable that the grizzly. My fear would be what you state below, that I would be buying belts left and right.
Quote:
If there is any way to can stretch your budget to $600 I'd suggest you look at the Grizzly 2x72". Probably half of the knife makers in this country got one of those after wasting money on all the little grinders that are mostly designed for wood working. There is more than a world of difference in them.
The small grinders have weak motors and bog down very easily. Still, if you use fresh belts and a very light touch you can grind a blade. But, a 1x42" is a narrow and short belt. That means not much grinding grit on there and so they go dull very quickly which means you need more belts to make that blade. The money you save up front will get spent buying belts and wasting hours of your time (if you put any value on your time).
Out of curiosity how many belts do you go through on a(for example)4" knife?

Quote:
So, both of those grinders are quality grinders for their intended purpose but grinding blades isn't their forte. I know that not everyone can afford $600 right off the bat for a new hobby, I get that, but rather than spend $250 on a tiny grinder you might be better off money wise spending $100 on a 4x36 or similar grinder (man, it hurts to me recommend that!). Better yet, and I'm totally serious about this, buy a few high quality files, a Diston hacksaw with bi-metal blades, a good vise, and lots of sand paper. Lots of guys make knives using only those tools and save up their money to get a real grinder later. Best of all, that practice will help you later when you have a belt grinder and those tools will always be needed in your shop....
I think I may just set up a filling jig and save my pennies until I can afford a Grizzly.(or better yet a KMG!) Thank you for the help!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-28-2014, 09:21 AM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,816
A 2x48" with a 1 hp motor is magnitudes better than any 1" sander. Not as good as a 2x72 but still very usable. The biggest draw back on the 2x48 is that most don't have a contact wheel or not much of one but, still, they do have a decent platen. Saving for a 2x72 is probably the wiser course though.

As for how many belts, I use one 60 grit per blade because a sharp belt is necessary in order to get clean grind lines. That belt is still useful for profiling another blade later but I never grind bevels with it again. After that, all the other belts (120, 220, 400) that I use will probably get used on two or three blades but, on occasion, I may have to use two 400 belts on a blade. But, again, all of this is true because my belts are 2x72 and have a lot of surface area and good horsepower behind them. Small belts and weak motors will need more belts to get the job done ....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-01-2014, 04:07 AM
DanCom's Avatar
DanCom DanCom is offline
Skilled
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Leduc County, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 314
It's good to point out that any sander/grinder you buy today is not necessarily wasted when you upgrade down the road. I have a 1x30", a 4x36" and a 2x72" and still find uses for them small ones; leather, wood, polishing etc.

Dan
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
arrow, back, baldor, belt, blade, files, grinder, grinding, hobby, how to, kalamazoo, knife, knife making, knives, leather, make, making, motor, sand, sharp, sharpening, steel, tools, wood


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bench grinder vs. Belt grinder stillwaters The Newbies Arena 7 03-13-2013 06:36 AM
Bench grinder into belt grinder? nutball Tool Time 9 07-18-2012 10:45 AM
Cheap bench grinder/polishing grinder Peldor The Newbies Arena 7 01-23-2007 03:02 PM
Bench sander/grinder samlieblich Tool Time 1 04-09-2005 02:06 AM
bench grinder buddy Tool Time 2 11-02-2003 02:34 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:09 PM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved