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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 07-05-2019, 01:59 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: In the woods of Central Oklahoma
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Beginner's Metallurgy Book

I'm fully aware that as a newbie to knife making, I should read every single metallurgy book/DVD I can find. I wouldn't even begin to argue that point. Only problem with that is my "Banker" won't let me spend that much money all at once. There are enough titles on the subject to fill a 3-ring binder.

Can anyone give me a suggestion as to the first book I should read/invest in on the subject of metallurgy? I'm going to have to read them as my pocket book allows.
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:55 PM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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Talking

Just my humble opinion (no, I lied. I don't have humble opinions ) but for the first book on metallurgy you can't beat Steel Metallurgy for the Non-Metallurgist by John Verhoeven and printed by ASM International.

Doug


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  #3  
Old 07-06-2019, 08:57 AM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Holy Cow!!!!!! $227 on Amazon! My pocket book would never allow for that kind of expense just for a book. Thanks, I'll check and see if anyone I know around here has one I could borrow. WHEW! $227 for a book?????
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Old 07-06-2019, 12:03 PM
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cnccutter cnccutter is offline
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I second Dougís suggestion. Itís a little dry to read but really delves into the meat of things.

You need to look again on Amazon, I just looked and itís 99$ prime new or 79$ prime used.

Erik


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Old 07-06-2019, 01:42 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Well, that's slightly more palatable............but still out of my range for right now. Guess I looked at the wrong page on Amazon!
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Old 07-06-2019, 03:41 PM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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Some of the private sellers can have a wild idea of what their books and videos are worth. I remember a private seller who, as I recall, want something like $300 for Chuck Burrows' sheath making video when there were still some outlets that had them in stock.

I checked and confirmed what Erik found and it's $99 on Amazon Prime. There is also Metallurgy Fundamentals by I consider it a supplament to Verhoeven's book which is written with the knifemaker, both smith and stock removal, in mind.

Doug


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Old 07-06-2019, 04:17 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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I'm not enrolled in Amazon Prime.............but as I said, that's still out of my league.
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Old 07-07-2019, 02:42 PM
damon damon is offline
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do you want to make knives or study metallurgy?

Wayne Goddards books "the wonder of knife making" and "$50 knife shop" will get you started in right direction and still leave you with enough $$ to get some 1084 to work with. its easy enough to work with and heat treat without fancy heat treat ovens. it you need a $200+ metallurgy book to know whats in the steel, youll FOR SURE need a $2000+ oven to heat treat it. you use to be able to get these books on ebay for under $20

books: you can also check local book store (Books-a-million, or barns & noble)
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=50+knife+...b_sb_ss_i_3_13

steel:
https://newjerseysteelbaron.com/shop...-steel/1084hc/


hope this helps
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  #9  
Old 07-07-2019, 03:29 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Location: In the woods of Central Oklahoma
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While I truly respect the suggestions of all those more knowledgeable about the subject, and while I'd be willing to bet Master level knife makers have a very thorough knowledge of proper heat treating, I tend to lean toward what you are saying, damon. I used to play the violin in the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. Didn't have to be able to hand craft a violin to be able to play one proficiently. So I'll probably go the route you suggest, at least to get started.
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Old 07-07-2019, 08:41 PM
Wrankin Wrankin is offline
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Well, as in all things, moderation (in other words I am going to try and straddle the fence here, let's see how that goes ).

I agree that at the entry level of knife making a detailed knowledge of metallurgy and materials is not required and can even get in the way in some cases. Don't overthink things and focus on the mechanical issues behind shaping a piece of steel. With 1084 the heat treat is pretty much cookbook just follow the instructions and you'll get a good edge.

But then at some point soon afterwards you are going to ask the dreaded question - Why?

* Why is the heat treat slightly different for 1095 than it is for 1084?
* What is Austenite, Cementite and why should I care?

Now the metallurgy of steel is a very complex subject and people can spend many years studying it but the basic principals (for simple steels) are fairly straightforward. May I suggest wikipedia as your first stop:

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austenite

Also Google is your friend - there are many resources available that give good basic information on the chemistry of steel. If you find yourself getting a bit lost or confused then a good layman's survey like Verhoeven (caveat: I have not read it) may be in order. But give Google a try first and see what you find.

Good luck,

-b


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  #11  
Old 07-07-2019, 08:45 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Thanks for the suggestion, Bill.
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2019, 09:32 PM
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TexasJack TexasJack is offline
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Bob Engnath has been dead for quite a while, but his web site is still available and still has a TON of good information: http://www.engnath.com/intable.htm


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Old 07-07-2019, 09:35 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Thanks, TexasJack, that site holds a wealth of knowledge. Looks as if I'm going to be printing off a lot of that info. Much appreciated.
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  #14  
Old 07-08-2019, 03:24 PM
Chris C Chris C is offline
 
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Just a follow-up: I went ahead and ordered Goddard's The Wonder of Knifemaking. All I could afford right now. It'll be the start of my "library", I guess. Our town's main library is closing because they built a new one. In their infinite wisdom, they've decided it will cost them too much to move all the books, so they are going to have a huge sale and buy new ones for the new building. Go Figger!!!!!! Anyway, I plan on stopping by there tomorrow to see what they have in the way of knife making and metallurgy books to see if I want to attend the sale. Books go for between $1 and $10 at those sales. (wasteful idiots)
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Old 07-08-2019, 05:04 PM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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When I was in Junior High, or somewhere around there, the local library decided to clear out some of the junk out of their archive and just put out for a rummage sale. Some of the "junk" was Lincoln artifacts. One of the local historians saw that and bundled them up and took them to the city council.

Doug


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