MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions > Fit & Finish

Fit & Finish Fit and Finish = the difference in "good art" and "fine art." Join in, as we discuss the fine art of finish and embellishment.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-23-2003, 11:51 AM
Don Robinson's Avatar
Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Brownsville, Texas
Posts: 4,873
Finishing a stag handle

As some of you know, I'm getting kind of old. That said, my memory isn't as good as it was 20 years ago. :confused:

It's been years since I used stag on a handle. I'm using my last piece of stag on a large straight knife.

I can't remember what to use to seal the stag after finishing the knife. It seems to me that I've used superglue or simply buffed-in paste wax on stag in the past.

What do you young'uns use or recommend? Is it acceptabe to just polish it on a buffing wheel with paste wax?

Don Cowles, old friend, what do you say?

By the way, I've changed my email address and web page URL. I'll see if I can figure out how to update my profile.

Here's the new email address: drobinson@rgv.rr.com

Custom Made Knives & Jewelry
by Don Robinson
http://home.rgv.rr.com/donrob
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-23-2003, 12:44 PM
Don Cowles's Avatar
Don Cowles Don Cowles is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Royal Oak, Michigan
Posts: 2,192
Send a message via AIM to Don Cowles
Hi, Don-

I don't use a lot of stag, but when I use it, I just give it a very light buffing followed with a coat of Renaissance wax. Fact is, both the buffing and the wax only touch the high points if the stag has any texture to it. Have found no need for sealing at all in my experience.

Good to see you around!


__________________


Don Cowles Custom Knives

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-23-2003, 02:18 PM
JimmySeymour JimmySeymour is offline
Steel Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 147
Send a message via Yahoo to JimmySeymour
I would like to know how some makers get that deep red to brown finish on the stag. I remember the blade magazine doing an article on it, but can't find it.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-23-2003, 03:59 PM
Don Cowles's Avatar
Don Cowles Don Cowles is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Royal Oak, Michigan
Posts: 2,192
Send a message via AIM to Don Cowles
Most such coloring is done with assorted dyes or potassium permanganate.


__________________


Don Cowles Custom Knives

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-23-2003, 06:45 PM
Jason Cutter Jason Cutter is offline
Living Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,903
Cool Lots of previous threads about finishing stag.

I love to use it but can't say I know all about it...

I personally think it pays to use good stag - meaning a piece that is dense and with a thick outer cortex. The inner core is crumbly and would not hold a tang securely for too long unless either it is removed and replaced with something that is tougher - like 2-tonne epoxy, or the core is stabilised.

I only ever internally stabilise my antler handles - I put in (read-pour in) the thinnest superglue I can find and let it set for up to a couple of days. Then I slot the inside for the tang. The superglue is pretty darn tough stuff when fully set. I never seem to need to finish the outside. Dense antler polishes beautifully to a mirror shine provided you don't grind down to the inner core structure which LOOKS very porous even when filled / stablised.

Naturally coloured antler from a deer that has had a healthy (and long) life and complete diet will give that rich dark brown colour. Potassium permanganate will do some nice coloration and so will anumber of other wood and leather dyes. The trick is getting the colour combination and the penetration depth just right, so there's a bit of individual "black magic" that everyone uses.

Once fully finished and polished, I like to rub in Danish oil - it seems to give the antler a very subtle tea-stained or mellow colour that has an antiqued look and probably seals any areas that have small holes or cracks.

Sorry for the long post, but I hope that makes sense. Jason.


__________________
JASON CUTTER BLADEART
Jason Cutter @ Dr Kwong Yeang
Knifemaker, Australia
(Matthew 10.16)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-24-2003, 11:24 AM
Don Robinson's Avatar
Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
Hall of Famer
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Brownsville, Texas
Posts: 4,873
My thanks to Don and Jason for the timely information. I even found a bottle of leather die left over from when I used to make leather sheaths. Thank the lord for Kydex!

The stag is two pieces of scale material. Hard to come by today.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-18-2003, 08:15 PM
Jlott Jlott is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 128
i think what you were getting at was...

what do you do about the pourous ends of the anter if they
happen to show at the butt of the knife handle or perhaps underneath where their may be some of the blood sponge left in the antler's center channe... YES..YOU ARE CORRECT.. IT IS SUPERGLUE.. apply it before final polish..let it harden.. buff n polish as normal... it will totally seal the pourous antler part that
shows...

>I would like to know how some makers get that deep red to brown finish on the stag.

thats an easy one.. they lightly burn it with their propane torch
and then light sanding of the high points and ends.. its an artistic touch you have to work at... the red is many times a dye...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
blade, knife, knives


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:44 AM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
? CKK Industries, Inc. ? All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved