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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 10-07-2004, 01:35 PM
chaos_customs chaos_customs is offline
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thickness

i was wondering wat a good thicknes would be when buying steel i was thinking of buying 1/4 inch but am not sure and am just looking for some advice
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  #2  
Old 10-07-2004, 01:41 PM
Jan Dox Jan Dox is offline
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It all depends on the kind of knives you want to make.

For stock removal using knives a good start is between 1/8" to 3/16".
1/4 " is allready on the heavy side.

Jan
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  #3  
Old 10-07-2004, 01:46 PM
chaos_customs chaos_customs is offline
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thanks thats wat i thought i was just getting a second opinion ya i am doing stock removeal and need to buy some steel to make a couple fighters and some bowies
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  #4  
Old 10-07-2004, 02:53 PM
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SteveS SteveS is offline
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I'd go 3/16" Think about it. Metal pounders use a lot of 1/4" stock and you loose a bunch to scale and such. So the finished product is often under 1/4". With stock removal you don't loose that much thickness.

Not saying you can't have a 1/4" thick fighter, but that's a big knife.

(Maybe you shouldn't listen to me. My favorite size for my style knife is 3/32".)

Steve


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  #5  
Old 10-07-2004, 04:57 PM
george tichbour george tichbour is offline
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Stock removal takes a long time, try to start with a thinner material...at least at first.


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  #6  
Old 10-09-2004, 11:28 AM
chaos_customs chaos_customs is offline
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ya i bought a piece of steel today its a 4 foot length of 1/8 " that is 4 " wide i got it at cadiain tire and am not sure if it will ht if not oh well its still good pratice right and it was only 10 bucks so not that big a loss
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Old 10-09-2004, 11:52 AM
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chaos,

Probably not a tool steel. To see if you can make a knife, cut a piece off, heat it with a torch until a magnet won't stick to it (just above red hot). Plunge it into some water.

If it hardens up (it'll probably crack too), it's a hardenable steel, duh. If not it's good for practice and making knife fittings like guards.

Steve


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Old 10-09-2004, 02:04 PM
chaos_customs chaos_customs is offline
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ya that was my general idea if i cant use it to make knives there will be a use for it some where i am actualy useing it now i have one blade ready to cut out and another on the bench i am hand planeing some walnut for the handle at the moment
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  #9  
Old 10-09-2004, 04:21 PM
Jason Cutter Jason Cutter is offline
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At the price, it doesn't sound like any sort of tool steel, unless the guy who sold it had no idea.

I think that for starters, 1/8th inch is a good stock thickness. I'm not sure how you are going to be doing your stock removal, but there won't be too much work removing metal on 1/8th inch thickness. If you got 5/32inch thick stock and started working on that, you'll notice that the added 1/32inch thickness, already makes quite a difference to the time and effort involved. Let alone the steps up to 3/16th, 7/32inch and 1/4inch stock. The main work is in developing the main bevels.

When choosing thickness, the width of the blade also makes a difference. A wide blade will often "require" a thicker blade to help maintain the same cutting characteristics as a narrower blade without losing strength. Think about it - a 2inch wide blade vs. a 1inch wide blade.

Aside from that the thickness will affect the balance and of course, weight of the knife. 1/4inch thickness seems a sort of magic "macho" number for combat / survival etc. but its probably not the type of heft most men would tolerate for long before abandoning it for a lighter more handy knife for the general chores.

You might already know all this - pardon my rambling. Jason.


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  #10  
Old 11-01-2004, 06:38 PM
Joe H. Joe H. is offline
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Funny, i was going to post this same question.
Im starting with tool steel I got at a hard ware store, it is 1/8in thick, and 1 1/2 in wide. so it works good for starters. i found a place where I can get better knife making steel, but I have to buy a minumum of 20ft, so i was trying to think of what would be the most usefull size.
i think that 1 1/2 wide by 3/16 thick would be the most usful.
heavy enough for fighter but not so hard to get thiner if nesasary.

just my 2cents
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  #11  
Old 11-03-2004, 01:20 PM
miller14 miller14 is offline
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Hey,

One thing to also consider if you have not already is what you want to do for a gaurd. The thinner the stock the smaller the files you need to mill out your gaurd.
With 3/16 obviously you need to have files smaller than your drill bit. I don't think there is enough meat in 3/16 to file a shoulder 360 around the ricasso. I file the gaurd sides nice and square and undersize, then a drive fit to home plate. If you use 1/4" you have enough meat to file a shoulder around the ricasso area, and this will be more forgiving when it comes to fitting your gaurd. You will just mill it out to clear the tang then run it up to the shoulders.
I only mention it because I got caught off gaurd by that along time ago. I made a nice blade that was pretty thin, didn't think ahead, and had no files to slot my gaurd.
If you do file shoulders make sure and use a radius. another topic

Take it easy, and good luck

Rick
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