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Ed Caffrey's Workshop Talk to Ed Caffrey ... The Montana Bladesmith! Tips, tricks and more from an ABS Mastersmith.

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  #1  
Old 01-21-2004, 11:45 PM
dazzeddd dazzeddd is offline
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stabilized wood

what does it mean when the wood is said to be stabilized
Sorry for such a basic question
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  #2  
Old 01-24-2004, 07:28 AM
Howard Rich Howard Rich is offline
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It means a resin of some type has been soaked into the wood to fill the gaps between the fibers. So a wood or stone can be hardened so it can have a nicer finish and usable without fast wearing and keeping it looks.
I have used thin superglue and it works fine.
Howard
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2004, 06:35 PM
arcadianforge arcadianforge is offline
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My understanding of stabilized wood is that it has been impregnated under pressure to a considerable depth with a resin, if not all the way through. I have made a few handles with wood I had commercially stabilized. This is not cheap....A stabilized wood handle is very waterproof/weatherproof, is less likely to split than the untreated wood, and needs only buffing to finish it. Therefore I have used it on filet knives and on hunting knives when the customer indicated the knife would get heavy use or get wet a lot. Stabilized wood stinks when you work it, and I always make sure I have my respirator on when I'm grinding it. I doubt I'll ever make a knife for myself using stabilized wood, as--to me--it doesn't feel or look like "real wood" any more.


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  #4  
Old 02-20-2004, 09:44 PM
bandido bandido is offline
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stabilizing wood

FYI, Pat at Northcoastknives has a good tutorial on how to stabilize your own wood. I tried it on some old cow bone and soft pine worked real well. Here is the link:

http://www.northcoastknives.com/nort...ints_tips3.htm

Have fun.. give it a try, always trying something new.

Bandido
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  #5  
Old 02-23-2004, 02:11 PM
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Woodchuck Forge Woodchuck Forge is offline
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Stabalized Wood

I like using stabalized woods when needed. Some materials require stabalizing in order for the material to be hard and tough enough to utilize in a knife handle. Buckeye burl and redwood burl to name just two. Stabalizing the wood sets not only the materal but the color as well. I have not had aproblem with fading or color change that I have had with natural woods. It also brings out the figure in the material. A piece of so so wood can take on a whole new look when it has been stabalized. If you go to www.stabilizedwood.com it explains the process and give prices of stablalized materials. A quality piece of stabalized wood for a handle will cost from $7-$50. I have several pieces of non-stabalized woods that are in that price range. Take a look at their website and see the material. Try out a piece or two and you may like what you come up with.....

Chuck
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  #6  
Old 02-23-2004, 11:18 PM
bandido bandido is offline
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I agree with Woodchuck Forge quote

"using stabalized woods when needed. Some materials require stabalizing in order for the material to be hard and tough enough to utilize in a knife handle. Buckeye burl and redwood burl to name just two. Stabalizing the wood sets not only the materal but the color as well. I have not had aproblem with fading or color change that I have had with natural woods. It also brings out the figure in the material. A piece of so so wood can take on a whole new look when it has been stabalized."

I am a firm believer of learning how its done by at least trying it once.. I like the results I have been getting with stabilzed wood and bone better than the laminates. I love the look of burl.

By learning to stabilize my own scales is an addition to the learning curve. I am "el cheapo" while I learn new things. I am now working with folders and although many of the knives I am making are not meant to be works of art they are my working patterns when I get it right. LMAO, I got a bucket of screwups that eventually might end up being damascus when I am ready to try that to.

By dyeing and stabilizing my cheap available woods, wallyworld cow shin bones (pet section sterilzed & virgin white - have to fight my dogs for these), mesquite, olive and pine, I get to learn and play at the same time. Others have learned to offer a service that can be done with reasonable compentancy and practice, leaving the choice to do it myself or buy it already done.

ITry it, you might like it.. Not a rant just my .02 worth as I try to learn all I can about this craft.

Bandido


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  #7  
Old 02-24-2004, 09:23 AM
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Woodchuck Forge Woodchuck Forge is offline
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attempting stabalizing

I tried to do some of my own, I built a high pressure/vaccum cylender and used acrylic resin. I used the resin begause that is what the finished product smells like. I would put all the materials in the chamber, draw a vaccum and hold it for a couple of days. Then I would pressurize up to 600psi, thats all my regulator would go. Hold that for a couple of days up to a week, then repeat the process two or three times. I had some success but also a lot of failures. I fugure that if I do 30lbs plus I can get WSSI to do it a lot cheaper at $6/lb than if I keep messing up $50-$100/bf pieces of wood. I have not yet tried the method on

http://www.northcoastknives.com/nort...nts_tips3.htm.

It looks interesting but the professionals do it so much better. They can even dye the wood, I am not really a fan of the dyed woods but some customers really like it.

Well I rambled enough
Chuck
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  #8  
Old 02-24-2004, 03:21 PM
bandido bandido is offline
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Chuck

I agree " the professionals do it so much better". But I'm referring to the learning curve to further ones self knowledge and still have the option/choice to do it myself or buy it already done.

I'm not on the 30 - 60 lb volume and have some scales I have done doing 1 or two at a time. Yes, with a larger volume, time is money as well as financial investment, then sub it out.

I think we are beating this to death over choices and good points were made small scale vs. larger scale..

Adios
Bandido


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Last edited by bandido; 02-24-2004 at 03:23 PM.
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  #9  
Old 02-24-2004, 04:40 PM
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Woodchuck Forge Woodchuck Forge is offline
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Concure.... Good Luck

Chuck
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