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The Newbies Arena Are you new to knife making? Here is all the help you will need.

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  #1  
Old 06-03-2013, 09:10 AM
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smithy smithy is offline
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Protective gloves

What type of gloves is the best to use to prevent small cuts and abrasions. I am taking a heavy duty blood thinner and any little "nick" results in a LOT a blood flow. I have searched and found a ton of gloves with no explanation about their protective qualities.

If you have any experience, or can recommend a specific item, I would really like to know. As always, TIA. ...Teddy
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:37 AM
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miketheknife miketheknife is offline
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Try a pair of butchers chain mesh. I dont know how much feel you will have. My father is in the same boat and a shaving cut will bleed all day. Good luck!
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Old 06-03-2013, 10:30 AM
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WynnKnives WynnKnives is offline
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I don't mean to take this light-hearted... but you may be in the wrong hobby

But you may try some rubber coated gloves, they have a basic cloth on the top and rubber on the palms and fingers, I used to use them quite a bit when I worked in a wood working facility to prevent cuts and splinters. But I would try to avoid wearing gloves whenever possible, machinery and gloves don't mix.
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:08 AM
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The woodcraft store sells some gloves to use when a person is carving.


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Old 06-03-2013, 03:21 PM
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Naboyle Naboyle is offline
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I have have a pair of Kevlar level 4 cut resistant gloves I got from work that I wear. They aren't cut proof but I have yet to get cut or anything after a few slips and a few bumps into my belt grinder. They are a lil thick and you don't have much dexterity with them but we're required to wear them at work anytime we're cutting, grinding or burning so I'm use to them.
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Old 06-03-2013, 04:29 PM
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Fulmaduro Fulmaduro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketheknife View Post
Try a pair of butchers chain mesh. I dont know how much feel you will have. My father is in the same boat and a shaving cut will bleed all day. Good luck!
I am a meat cutter/ butcher by trade and wear a stainless steel mesh wire glove all day on my non-cutting hand. You will not get cut with these gloves. But they also do not allow one to feel much of anything but do give purchase on gripping slimy bloody hunks of meat, etc. They are also very expensive, $100 or more unless you find one used on Ebay.

By themselves they will not allow you to grip hard objects like a blade blank you are grinding on. But, if you do put a cotton or cloth mesh glove over the top they will work. This would allow somebody on blood thinners peace of mind. BUT, one must be very careful on ensuring it does not get snagged or caught on machinery, such as between the belt and the lower wheel on a grinder! One could also hand sand a blade with one covered with a cloth glove as above , but just have to learn how to do it with finesse.

I would give this method a thumbs up for the best protection for the determined knifemaker taking the blood thinners. Extra care is especially required around any machinery in your situation. Also, a very pointy small blade tip can poke through the glove if you are not careful. Maybe large Bowies are in order! And the glove will not help if you ever stab yourself by forgetting a blade attached to a vice! Just my 2 cents.

Tony Zanussi
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:30 PM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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Another thing to consider is getting the glove caught in the grinder either between the belt and the stage or between the belt and a wheel. The first might damage your grinder, the second might damage your hand.

Doug


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Old 06-03-2013, 11:17 PM
Hempish Hempish is offline
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Mechanix gloves are pretty awesome all around I use them for work almost every day and they hold up great. Also great feel for wearing gloves of course.
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:26 AM
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Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
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Never wear gloves or sleeves while using a rotating tool!!!
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Old 06-04-2013, 07:31 AM
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teejay1980 teejay1980 is offline
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You could look at police supply companies and get a pair of puncture and cut resistant gloves. We use them to search people and they are fairly thin and dextrous but they aren't cheap.
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  #11  
Old 06-20-2013, 08:57 PM
Buckstawker Buckstawker is offline
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Ahhhh, here is something I can answer! Welcome to the trade. I am rather new at making knives myself, but I am a 10 year safety professional. First and foremost, there is NO SUCH THING AS A CUT PROOF GLOVE! I can't state that enough. You still need to use extreme caution when using cut resistant gloves. The gloves should be relied upon for incidental contact and general use.

The type of glove you want is something that will give you dexterity to handle the knife and other tools (files, sand paper, punches, drills, etc.), but still give you the protection you need. DuPont kevlar provides excellent cut protection but can be bulky (no offense Naboyle . Bulky gloves also have more potential to get caught in rotating equipment. You should consider looking at a glove made of Dyneema or High Performance Polyethylene Engineered (HPPE) fiber. These types of materials are stronger than Kevlar by weight, so you can get a glove that is more form fitting and lightweight, and still allow you to handle the items you need with good protection.

You can look up cut resistant gloves online and a many manufacturers will come up. When selecting gloves, you want to pay attention to the ratings. There is EN388 and ANSI ratings. EN388 ratings give you 4 numbers (Abrasion, cut, tear, puncture). The scale is 1-4 with 4 being the highest rating and 1 the lowest. ANSI gives you strictly cut resistant ratings based on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the highest and 1 being the lowest. Do not compare the two as the test methods to come up with the ratings are completely different, and I would stick with ANSI rated gloves. Go with a mid to high level 2 rated glove and you should be good to go. Getting into 3 might start to get bulky, but that would be for you to decide. I work in sheet metal fabrication business, and in general a high cut level 2 or low three will be adequate. One more thing, and hope this does not muddy the waters. When selecting a glove, try to find one that has a glass additive, which creates a dulling action on very sharp surfaces (razor blades, knives), and will help prevent the potential for the glove to fail and you getting hurt.

I hope this helps you find something that will work for you. I personally use Banom Terminator gloves while working on my knives. They are like a second skin and most of the time I forget I am wearing them. if you want more info, feel free to email me.

Todd
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