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Tool Time Let's talk shop. Equipment, Tips & Tricks, Safety issues - Post it here.

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  #1  
Old 03-06-2001, 06:33 PM
moldy Jim
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Hydraulic press


I've asked others before but haven't got a satisfactory (to me) answer to my question so I'll try again.
Recently I have been interested in making a press. I have seen an Air/hydraulic jack that is air actuated for what I consider to be a very reasonable price.

Has anyone tried making a press out of one of these things? I already have a compressor, so it would be just a matter of building a frame and spendimg $90 to $150 for the jack. No motor, pump etc to deal with.

Does anyone see a reason it wouldn't work?

For $90 I can get a 8 ton (kinda small?) with a long stroke or for about $150 I can pick up a 20 ton unit.

Would 8 ton be enough for blade work? Or should I go for a bigger one?

I have most of the stuff for a regular press (BIG!) but it would be sooo much easier with the air/hydraulic unit.

Any advice?

Moldy

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  #2  
Old 03-08-2001, 12:23 AM
Geno
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Jim,
I'd go with the 20 ton myself.Are you sure your compressor can handle the load?I'v heard of air hammers but not air presses.This could be interesting.Most people use hydraulics.(Myself included)Keep us up.OK?
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  #3  
Old 03-08-2001, 11:04 AM
moldy Jim
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Air over oil


Geno,
The jack is air over oil. I don't know exactly how it works but it is a hydraulic pressure device. The air is just the actuating mechanism instead of (in addition to) the hand pump.
It looks like a regular jack unit including the pump handle, but with an additional block on the side that the air is connected to.
Some auto garages have roller jacks that work the same way.
My only real question is if it would work fast enough.
Thanks
Moldy Jim
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  #4  
Old 03-09-2001, 07:45 AM
scotton2
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Re: Air over oil


JIM, THE JACKS THAT YOU ARE DISCUSSING WORK REAL QUICK. I HAD WONDERED ABOUT A PRESS MADE FROM ONE OF THE , MYSELF. sam
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  #5  
Old 03-09-2001, 08:14 AM
Geno
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Re: Air over oil


I have that problem with my press too, plenty of power just not enough speed.I need a b[gger pump.(more G.P.M.)I would still go with the big cylinder though.
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  #6  
Old 03-09-2001, 04:14 PM
moldy Jim
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jacks


Thanks Guy's, I just got a small patent check for an idea I came up with at work. I guess I'll have to go buy one of those things and try it out.
Cool!
Jim
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  #7  
Old 03-09-2001, 09:35 PM
Mike Sader
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Re: jacks



Gene, are you using a 2 stage pump?you get the speed till you hit pressure then it shifts to high press. I'm sure you prob. already know this but I just had to ask. Mike Sader
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  #8  
Old 03-10-2001, 11:57 AM
Geno
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Re: jacks


Mike,I doubt mlne is two stage. It is an old pipe bender from a muffler shop.Stong but slow.
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  #9  
Old 03-14-2001, 11:43 AM
moldy Jim
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Hydraulic press


Well, a friend gave me the pump for a hand operated press yesterday. Looking at it I had a wierd thought, what if I hooked up a motor and crank to actuate the handle? Simple to do, just a slider in a crank to make it reciprocate.
Then once it reached it's limit I could go to the hand lever and pump it the rest of the way.
Just a thought.
Moldy
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  #10  
Old 03-29-2001, 01:59 AM
Geno
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Moldy,
What are you using the press for?I have a cold press made from a 20 ton hydrolic truck jack.It works O.K. for mokume but you need power and speed for a forging press.My tube bender press is super strong but quite slow.I have to get a bigger pump for more G.P.M.I may have to sacrifice some tonage for more speed,but I got to have it!
A HOT billet can't wait for the ram to move.
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  #11  
Old 06-23-2001, 10:57 AM
Joe
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Any results?


I've been seriously looking at making a light-duty press with the air-actuated hydraulic jacks also. Mostly for straightening blades in a couple of squeezes, but I'd also like to be able to flatten some round bar. How fast do these type of jacks move?
Any response is greatly appreciated.



joe
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  #12  
Old 06-23-2001, 03:07 PM
Bob Warner
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Re: Any results?


The air over oil is OK as long as the cylinder produces the pressure you want. The air just makes the hydraulics work. It will be easire to create a foot pedal with air, I would think.

I think that the pressure will do nothing more than make things go faster. I have a friend that welds with a post vise. He gets everything ready and sticks it in the post vise and cranks it down with his leg until it get tight then uses his hand to crank it down real tight. This works really well and he has been making damascus for years.


I have just completed the frame (H-Frame) for my press and am ready to start on the hydraulics. I will be using a 5" cylinder that delivers 48,000 pounds of pressure and an 11 GPM two stage pump. From reading Don Foggs page I think I am on the right track. My question is how to mount the thing. I am building a porch onto my shop that will be covered on three sides but open on the end. Therefore when forging the Carbon monoxide will go away with fans and the heat will also go away, making things bearable. However, I don't plan to pour a slab in this area. I want it to be dirt. But the press is really heavy duty (8" I-Beam with 1/2" web and sides and 7" tall). I have welded plates to the bottom of the legs for mounting. I was thinking of burrying two railroad ties into the ground (front to back) and mounting to them to keep it from tipping over forward or backwards. It is 34" wide so I think I am OK on the side to side movement.

Anyone else have any suggestions?
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  #13  
Old 06-23-2001, 10:41 PM
Geno
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Re: Any results?


Bob,
I use a horizontal press. It takes up less room and has open dies on three sides. The weight is more evenly distributed for stability.
The stand up type presses are top heavy by design, big feet or counter balances are needed if there is no floor.
Check out the old Tool Time thread called" MY PRESS".

Joe and Jim,
Air over oil pumps can generate that kind of pressure but the equipment is costly. It was designed to be portable.
I just saw a 250 ton cylinder for a "Porta-Power" (foot pedal opperated) air over oil system.
It was only $2,750.00 USED.
(CYLINDER ALONE)

Log splitters, pipe and tubing benders, Iron worker presses all have enough power. They just have to be converted a little.

My press is an old pipe bender from a muffler shop.
The machine wouldn't do what they needed, but it was ALL I needed.Total cost, less than $500.00 bucks.

Keep us posted on results,OK?
.............................BE BLESSED.....................................
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  #14  
Old 06-24-2001, 09:44 AM
Plain ol Bill
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press


Here is another one joining the crowd and making a press. I am trying to decide whether to build my press onto the rear of my Kinyon style power hammer or to use an H frame I have. My hammer uses an 8 X 8 X 3/8 wall tube for its frame so it should take the pressure really well without deflection. My pump is two stage, 13 GPM. Which way would you go guys? H or built off a vertical post?
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  #15  
Old 06-24-2001, 06:38 PM
Bob Warner
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Re: press


Bill,

If I am reading your post correctly, you are thinking of building your press ONTO your existing hammer; Is this correct? Personally I like individual tools. Just like stereo systems, if one component goes bad, everything is disabled until you get it fixed. What if the frame of your hammer cannot take the pressure you think? You could damage your hammer and your press. Just something to think about.
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