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The S.R. "Steve" Johnson Forum Specialized knife making tips, technique and training for "ultra precision" design work enthusiasts.

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  #16  
Old 02-03-2015, 04:10 PM
TWITHERS TWITHERS is offline
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You know I have finished the knife except for my mark and sharpening. I am hoping to get my new logo before the Expo and use it instead of my old one. The 416 was most definitely easier to saw, mill and grind but I still had to go high up in grit to get the finish I wanted. It really stumps me. My wife, comforting me as she does says "Well how long has Steve Johnson been making knives?" I say "oh 40 years maybe", she says "there you go". Didn't make me feel better. Ha Ha. If I looked at the finish in the sunlight it looked great, but under the fluorescent lighting I could see the scratch marks. So I went to the higher grits. I would have come back and asked for help, but it has been explained as well as it can be I think. I do like the 416 better. It was easier to work with. I'll try again.
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  #17  
Old 02-04-2015, 03:26 PM
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Good report. Of course, 600x is necessary, or finer, before buffing. Depending on the light, you can never get rid of scratches! Polishing is nothing but ultra-fine scratches. For a bolster on a knife, I'l go to 600x, then as the disc wears, we then apply grease adn continue, until there is almost a polish. Also, the buffing compound must be very fine to give a super polish and even then, you can see scratches, if you get the light strong and bright enough. You're doing great, it sounds like!


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  #18  
Old 02-06-2015, 04:11 PM
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Thank you very much. I'm gonna do some bragging now though you know? I'll say "Well Steve Johnson said I was doing good". Just kidding of course but I do appreciate it coming from you.
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  #19  
Old 02-06-2015, 04:36 PM
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With my blessing .................as far as it'll get you..........


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  #20  
Old 02-06-2015, 10:52 PM
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Twithers,
Thanks for sharing the pics. That jig looks good!


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  #21  
Old 02-07-2015, 09:37 AM
TWITHERS TWITHERS is offline
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No problem Zappo, and thank you. Little jigs are not so tough to make if your lucky enough to have some aluminum lying around. Although it would last longer if it were hardened steel of some sort.
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  #22  
Old 02-13-2015, 04:01 PM
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Twithers,
Dumb question of the day, just to make sure I get the full benefit. The screws in your jig, are to hold the guard to your jig??


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  #23  
Old 02-13-2015, 04:47 PM
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The cap screws in the jig are there to adjust the angle of the entire jig. I cut the angle on the jig to approximately the degree I thought I needed. It was around 10 degrees, I think. So that gets the angle close then with the screws on each end of the jig I can turn the screw to raise either end and change the angle. Does that make sense? Remembering that the jig does not square the guard in the vise. The guard material should be square on the sides already then the vise will square the guard to the mill for the cut.
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  #24  
Old 02-13-2015, 10:03 PM
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Yes, thank you. I had read that in your earlier post and it didn't sink in...


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