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The Folding Knife Forum Materials, techniques and the designing of Folders.

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  #31  
Old 03-09-2007, 12:20 AM
ddushane ddushane is offline
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Don, Good to hear from you. I converted my surfacing machine over to belt the first week it came in. I put a serrated wheel on it and except for using the 36 grits for hogging I use trizact belts and get as smooth of a finish as I've seen people get with the rocks. I sure have saved the ends of my fingers since I bought the surfacing machine. Talk to yall later, Dwayne


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  #32  
Old 01-03-2008, 12:33 AM
CWKnifeman CWKnifeman is offline
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I know that this hasn't been open for a while, but here goes. As someone who has worked Ivory off and on for about 29 years,Stabilization of Ivory can be done several waysThompson's water seal is one that is probably the least expensive way to go; Minimal color change but it will still flex a little. Next is Paleo Bond many coats over several days; with no distinctive color change, with little movement. Next is Comercial stabilizition; sometimes you may have a slight color change, very little if any movement. Lastly super- glue; minimal color change, but may have some movement. No matter hwich method you use always use either thin super-glue (the cyano type), as this will fill any surface pores. Once you've done this you can finish as needed. Ive never used the Blue rouge for plastics, but I've always used Zam Rouge compound on a wheel that I only use for Ivlry and then Pink no scratch.
I hope that this is of some help to others in the future.


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  #33  
Old 04-05-2008, 09:10 AM
tbark44 tbark44 is offline
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Well thats some interesting advive on Mammoth , Here is the method I have found works best for me , I use a Small Milling machine with a vise on it , I put a solid peace of tungston under it so it cant go any lower and help especialy if i need to take more off one end than the other , I set it as I want to cut it the clamp it with leather on ea side of the mat. put a Good sharp 3/4 Mill in it he machine and set it on med/high speed take off 1/8 in at a time , I never cut all the way to the side edges where the vise is but a trench down the middle , when I get it a thics as i need it , I pull it out go to the bandsaw and trim off the 2 edges putting the blade perpendicular with the flat on the back side , use a fresh 220 belt and lightly finnish sand it flat , this way almost No heat builds up ever , T
  #34  
Old 05-04-2008, 07:40 PM
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Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Vining
I make many folders with Mammoth Ivory and have to thin almost every piece. I usually take a small block of wood and attach some double sticky back tape to it. I then attach the mammoth piece with the bottom side out. This makes holding the piece a bit easier and keeps your hands away from the belts or disks. Very sharp belts will take of quite a bit of material real fast. If the piece starts to heat up, I use a small plate of aluminum as a quench plate. I just hold the piece down on the aluminum and it draws the heat out. I do this to keep the piece as cool as possible. As with other replies, you don't want the piece to get hot. You will not notice it right away but it will eventually start to stress and crack. Once I get the piece real close to it's final size, I soak it in Nelsonite for a day or two to seal it all up. They use Nelsonite to seal pool cues and Ive always had good luck with it. You can find smaller quantities of it at Ellis Knife Works.
http://refractory.elliscustomknifeworks.com/


Hope this helps

Bill
Yep, Bill, it did help me this time. I am currently working on my first custom order since early 2007, when I became unable to build knives. This customer wants two linerlock barlows with mammoth ivory and solid gold bolsters. I just ordered a quart of nelsonite from the Elliss's. I want everything to be as perfect as possible on these knives and don't want to gamble with the ivory. The customer is part of a jewelry store family, so he had their jeweler melt down old jewelry and cast the bolster material for me. $4,000.00 worth of gold on 2 knives, believe it or not. Now I have to turn quite a bit of it into grinding dust that goes onto the floor.

I'm feeling so much better since my successful parathyroid surgery that my Mom and I have signed up for a table at the Central Texas Knife Show in Roundrock, Texas this July. I have only a couple of knives on hand left for my table, so I'm going to ask this customer to lend me his knives for the show, and I have to build several more for the show in a very short time. God is great and time's a'wastin', as Snuffy Smith used to say.

Thanks, Bill, for the tip about nelsonite.

Last edited by Don Robinson; 05-04-2008 at 07:44 PM.
  #35  
Old 05-04-2008, 07:46 PM
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Bill Vining Bill Vining is offline
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Don,

Glad to hear everything went well with the surgery. Good to have you back! Make sure to post a few photos of those knives. They sound like quite a project.

Bill


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  #36  
Old 05-04-2008, 08:25 PM
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Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
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Bill, I just saw your website. I didn't know you made Texas Toothpicks. I've made several for my own entertainment while I couldn't take orders. Those and a few 2 blade trappers.

Your knives are all really outstanding!!

I'll post photos if they turn out well, but I really don't expect too much from the bolsters in a photo. Might as well be brass.
  #37  
Old 05-19-2008, 08:49 AM
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Don Robinson Don Robinson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbark44
Well thats some interesting advive on Mammoth , Here is the method I have found works best for me , I use a Small Milling machine with a vise on it , I put a solid peace of tungston under it so it cant go any lower and help especialy if i need to take more off one end than the other , I set it as I want to cut it the clamp it with leather on ea side of the mat. put a Good sharp 3/4 Mill in it he machine and set it on med/high speed take off 1/8 in at a time , I never cut all the way to the side edges where the vise is but a trench down the middle , when I get it a thics as i need it , I pull it out go to the bandsaw and trim off the 2 edges putting the blade perpendicular with the flat on the back side , use a fresh 220 belt and lightly finnish sand it flat , this way almost No heat builds up ever , T
I used this method with a little change to thin the scales down to 3/32" thick. I put one set at a time in the vise and milled the two outside edges flat and parallel. Next I placed a parallel under each scale and milled it down to 3/32" thick. As Tbark said, I left a small lip on each side by the vise jaws and just milled out the center. No heat generated at all, and they came out perfectly flat. I drilled the holes,c'bored them and mounted them on the liners, than sawed most of the excess off before removing the rest using a new 50 grit Norzon blue belt.

I'm waiting for the Nelsonite I ordered from the Ellis's now.
  #38  
Old 11-27-2008, 05:56 PM
Frank Niro Frank Niro is offline
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I've decided to add some ivory preparation work I feel is neecessary with how I work this material. I have used with good success ivory that has only been out of the ground for a few months. What I will do is either place the pieces in the rough sizes - small - of course or oversized scales in the microwave for drying. Microwaves heat from the inside of materials rather than the outside. I want the ivory to come up to a temperature just a bit more than it will be comfortable for me to hold in my hand. Certainly a little less will work too. This only takes about 25 seconds in the microwave I use. I allow the piece or pieces to cool and then repeat three or four times. Do not over heat! You will destroy the ivory.
I then over size any necessary the pieces and place them in baby or mineral oil which of course is available in any drug store, for several days. I do like to do this more than two or three days so I try to do this procedure well before getting involved in the actual fitting work. I'm sure you too will find this will assist you in working with this material. Remember as has been mentioned several times, it's the heat that affects the ivory not water as some have mentioned but getting the ivory thoughly dried out before fitting it to the knife is essential. I believe you will find this will work as well as the commercial stabilizing that does count on it being dry before it is done. Frank


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