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Heat Treating and Metallurgy Discussion of heat treatment and metallurgy in knife making.

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  #1  
Old 06-27-2004, 08:13 AM
RJ Martin RJ Martin is offline
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Manufacturers Data Sheets

This link is the starting point for all metallurgical data for Crucible's alloys:

www.crucibleservice.com/products/knife/index.cfm

Here is a link for BG42, made by Timken Latrobe:

http://www.timken.com/products/speci...42_Bearing.pdf

There is a wealth of information here.....


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Last edited by RJ Martin; 02-02-2005 at 06:46 PM. Reason: add/revise data
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Old 06-27-2004, 09:15 AM
Gary Hamilton Gary Hamilton is offline
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Thanks, for the link. I was a the site a couple of week ago and some how was look at tabs on both sides of data sheets and did not look at the data sheets. Some times I am a little slower than the rest of the class.


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Old 06-28-2004, 11:45 AM
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GANNMADE GANNMADE is offline
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http://www.knives.com/heatreat.html

http://www.evenheat-kiln.com/technic.../heattreat.htm

http://ajh-knives.com/metals.html


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Old 06-28-2004, 04:45 PM
shgeo shgeo is offline
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Bohler/Uddeholm, North America has good, comprehensive data sheets with heat treating info on their website:

http://www.bucorp.com/coldworksteels...coldworksteels

Just click on the appropriate tool steel in the menu on the left side.


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Old 10-29-2004, 01:17 AM
cramnhoj cramnhoj is offline
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The Timken Latrobe website also has data sheets for their tool steels, so if you're getting tool steels from toolanddie (w/c is from Timken) you should look at the Timken data sheets. As in particular their A2 (or was it D2?) has a different graph in toughness, it says A2 is toughest at around 57HRC whereas Crucible (as well as different knifemakers) says A2 is toughest at 60-61HRC. And I'd appreciate if someone could explain which one we should follow.
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Old 10-29-2004, 11:52 PM
shgeo shgeo is offline
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The Crucible data sheet on A2 has two peaks in toughness, at HRC 55 and HRC 60. They both show a Charpy C-notch value of 41 ft. lbs.

D2 has a broad peak between HRC 58 and 61, with the highest value at HRC 60 with Charpy C-notch value of 23 ft. lbs.

The Crucible data agree with those on other manufacturer's sites.

Timken is one of the suppliers for toolanddie.com. The other is Precision Marshall whose published specs figures agree with the above.

Both steels at HRC 60 are very impressive performers.


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Old 11-05-2004, 09:44 AM
cramnhoj cramnhoj is offline
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Check it out again and cleared that up. Although in the Timken data sheet, it says A2 would have a high toughness at lower 50's. Has anyone tried this? Would differentially hardened A2 be better than normally hardened ones?

Btw, this is the url for the Timken data sheets, they also have documents there about selection of tool steels and heat treating in general, could be useful for people starting out in knifemaking.
http://www.timken.com/products/speci...eneraltech.asp
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Old 07-29-2007, 04:30 PM
mcninch mcninch is offline
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whats the aloy makeup of cpm 154
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Old 07-30-2007, 11:09 AM
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mete mete is offline
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CPM154 and 154CM have the same chemistrybut are made differently. CPM154 is better [finer ,more evenly distributed carbides] but more expensive.
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Old 07-30-2007, 10:11 PM
mcninch mcninch is offline
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mete thanks for info, im going to send four blades to d holder soon for heat treat.
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Old 04-12-2015, 01:34 PM
samuraistuart samuraistuart is offline
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Something should be done with this thread.....especially since it is a sticky. Out of all the links provided, only the AJH-Knives link is correct. All others are dead links. The Timken links aren't good either.
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