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High-Performance Blades Sharing ideas for getting the most out of our steel.

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  #1  
Old 09-29-2006, 09:11 PM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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silver casting

So i've been looking all over for some 3mm (8 gauge) sterling sheets. so far none to be found.

Question is this, what do I need to cast my own?

Ed


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  #2  
Old 09-29-2006, 10:37 PM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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I looked through all my Jewelers supply catalogs and the thickest I found was 2.6mm At ReoGrande.If I run across some I'll let you know.What are you making that requires 1/8th inch sterling sheet?


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  #3  
Old 09-29-2006, 11:35 PM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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well here's th deal. I have a damascus dagger I want to use sterling for bolsters. I figured 3mm was somewhat on the small side.

Anyways, here's my schematics.


note the front and rear bolster, the front I have yet to draw in but that's max limits, the rear will be filled in.

And here's the damascus it's goign to fit on


and the front bolster location


The goal is to put sterling on both sides of the ivory and use sterling pins and ebony spacers. I also thought about using 2 layers of sterling. I have looked everywhere and the thickness I need/want seems unobtainable so I figured the best way to go is cast my own stuff or find someone to cast the mold I make.

Ed


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Gold is for the mistress - silver for the maid
Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall
But steel - cold steel is master of them all.
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)
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Old 09-30-2006, 01:37 AM
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McAhron McAhron is offline
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If you cant find what you need then you could high temp solder several pieces together.I agree,even 3mm would be thin for this design.Your drwing doesnt have demensions on the width of the bolsters(outer edge to edge)RioGrande has .625x.188/15.8x4.8mm rectangles,order#100-589


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Old 09-30-2006, 01:44 AM
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Here you go.1/4 thick 1x1inch,also available in longer lengths at Surepure Chemetals, http://www.surepure.com/products.php...7&meas2_ID=1ls,


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  #6  
Old 09-30-2006, 09:33 AM
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B.Finnigan B.Finnigan is offline
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If you are feeling adventurous you can cold hammer silver down to the thickness you need. Use a MAPP or propylene torch to anneal the silver and it will soften up enough to cold hammer without cracking. MAPP gas cylinders can found at most hardware stores for $8-$9 and they fit on a regular propane torch head. Heat the metal to a dark cherry red color and then quench it in water. It does not need to be quenched unless you want to imediately start hammering. You can air cool it while you go take a break and it will also soften that way.

After you get close to the thickness then you can file and then sand it to the exact thickness. I just cold hammered a copper belt buckle and it was fun because there is no forge or heat to deal with besides doing a couple anneals. The hammering will work harden non-ferrous metals so you have to anneal when you start to notice the metal not moving as fast under the hammer.

In the amount of time you probably spent searching the net you could have made the bolsters. That is one of the "yard sticks" I use when I decide to start with raw materials vs. trying to find something that appears to not exist.
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Old 09-30-2006, 10:10 AM
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Shakudo Shakudo is offline
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3mm is around the thickness you get from a 2 piece ingot mold. check with the local jewelers in your area and see if any will pour an ingot for you. do you have your own silver already? if not you are looking at around $60 worth of silver plus a shop fee.
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  #8  
Old 09-30-2006, 11:19 AM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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interesting. I called several shops local and everyone told me they cant do ir or order it.

I didn't think about hammering it. Also thanks for the link but that's plain silver, not sterling. I am going to end up using just plain silver I suspect. going to the coin shop today and get some ingots thats similar thickness/size I need.

I currently do not have my own silver, I did find a place that sells the rods I need, also have sterling tubing in 1/4inch and 1/2 inch which would be good for lanyard holes.

I did get the name/address of someone local who im told does casting and going to call her on monday.

Ed


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Gold is for the mistress - silver for the maid
Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall
But steel - cold steel is master of them all.
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)
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  #9  
Old 09-30-2006, 12:56 PM
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rhrocker rhrocker is offline
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Interesting Ed. Please keep us posted on how your project is going. That's a really nice dagger by the way, your work? I need to pore some silver for a project eventually, so I'll be following this very closely. I guess I better start by finding out the difference between silver, .999 fine, and sterling. I've not messed with the stuff much.


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  #10  
Old 09-30-2006, 01:04 PM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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This damascus is not my work. The guy I bought it from does alot of damascus and quite good at it to.

mostly the difference in sterling and .995/.999 is sterling is 7.5% copper and 92.5% silver.
Sterling is alot harder than regular silver and holds up where regular silver is soft and easy to mark. This is why 'nickel/silver' a.k.a. 'german silver' is used alot, looks similar but not quite the same and a big difference.

I also have several others from this guy and see the damascus forum for images

Ed


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Gold is for the mistress - silver for the maid
Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall
But steel - cold steel is master of them all.
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)
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  #11  
Old 09-30-2006, 02:04 PM
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B.Finnigan B.Finnigan is offline
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I have bought alot of silver from CC Silver. He has a good selection and you can buy very small amounts.

http://www.ccsilver.com/silver/silver.html

Last edited by B.Finnigan; 10-02-2006 at 02:22 PM.
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  #12  
Old 10-01-2006, 12:14 PM
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J.Arthur Loose J.Arthur Loose is offline
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I have an ingot mold from Rio that is 4mm thick and about 1.5" x 3".

Heat the ingot to around 500 F in the oven and pour molten silver into it. Use a large tip from oxy / acetylene or better, oxy propane / mapp. Melt in a melting crucible also available from Rio. For thicker pieces I would do some sand casting.

You could also carve the pieces in wax and lost wax cast them. This is the easiest way, and you can get the carving wax from Rio. There are many casters who will do all the work for you. Carving the pieces in wax or even wood and sand casting them would be a very easy alternative as well, especially as the back of the bolster is flat.

I recommend Tim McCreight's book Practical Casting.


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  #13  
Old 10-01-2006, 01:42 PM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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awsome! just what I was looking for. Should not be to hard or expensive at all. I just ordered that book to. If I was to setup something small it should no be that complex either.

Ed


__________________
Gold is for the mistress - silver for the maid
Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall
But steel - cold steel is master of them all.
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)
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  #14  
Old 10-02-2006, 11:16 AM
Doug Lester Doug Lester is offline
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Talking Ingot molds

Go to www.contenti.com, they have an adjustable ingot mold, 50x45x3.5mm, listed on sale for just under $18. The 3.5mm is a fixed demention.

Doug Lester
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  #15  
Old 04-03-2007, 09:51 PM
EdStreet EdStreet is offline
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I am going with the casting method instead. Several reasons for this, biggest one is cost, another is shape. I am playing around with sand casting and going to use some air hardening modeling clay to make the impression then sand cast it and pour silver. Should have minimal loss this way.

Ed


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Gold is for the mistress - silver for the maid
Copper for the craftsman cunning in his trade.
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall
But steel - cold steel is master of them all.
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)
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