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The Newbies Arena New to Knife Making? Here's all the help you need ...

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  #16  
Old 01-27-2017, 04:56 PM
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BCROB BCROB is offline
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ahhh yes the great white north region, AKA God's Country
a very broad area indeed , whereabouts there fellow Canuck ?


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  #17  
Old 01-27-2017, 05:23 PM
ash_a101 ash_a101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
That's a 1x30. Lots of guys try to start with those, including me, but most give up after a few days. They are terribly under powered and the belts are so small they wear out almost instantly. Personally, I can make a knife faster and easier with hand tools than with a 1x30.

Since you're in Canada I don't know if you'll be able to find that grinder of Jim's but it would be worth the extra trouble to try....
Exactly why I come here. Thanks for saving me some money and grief. I noticed a lot of guys using the higher end 2" sanders, but didn't realize it was a power issue. So really good to know. Looks like I'm going to have to look around a bit more. I've toyed with making my own, but that's a summer project.
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  #18  
Old 01-27-2017, 06:15 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Ash the company I bought my grinder from ships to Canada. They are called Zoro. They screwed up my order, but I'm not complaining they sent me a 1HP enclosed motor instead of a 3/4hp one. The grinder is a 2x48 and I cannot pick it up to put on my cart as it's heavier than I expected. Have to wait for my son.

Here is an inexpensive model to start with. Mine has one problem, the platen is not removable, but is hard (RC60) and flat over its whole length. I'll deal with it as the motor is worth what I paid for the whole thing. Didn't buy it for hollow grinds anyway.

https://www.zoro.com/dayton-beltdisc...45/i/G2309045/
Try this one. Tru-grit has belts that fit this and have a large selection and it's inexpensive. Hunter has one I think from Sears, or close to it.
https://trugrit.com/index.php?main_p...74bfb94c7f3a22
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  #19  
Old 01-27-2017, 07:39 PM
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Call Terry at TDM Grinders , he lives in BC now


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  #20  
Old 01-27-2017, 08:16 PM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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Well, shoot, don't tell him you got a 2x48 that's impressive and then link him to a 2x42, give him the choice. Here's the other one:

https://www.zoro.com/dayton-belt-gri...n7/i/G2178741/

If you can handle the extra cost the 2x48 is much more desirable ...


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  #21  
Old 01-28-2017, 03:01 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Yes Ray, but it is not an adjustable platen. I would send it back except they accidently sent me a bigger motor. The roller wheels are attached to the platen. It is only good for flat grinding. There is no option for slack belt grinding. I have my 1x42 for that so no big deal. No the Dayton is built like a tank and there are no tracking problems like with the Grizzly. I put the belt on it came with and it does not wobble at all.

It is a great grinder for the money but is not adjustable. I cannot recommend it to a newbie. I know how to modify it with my metal fab experience. But it is what it is. No hollow grind capability and the platen is 2.5" wide when it should be 2" wide. It is great for flat grinds, but no flexibility. Plus I got it on sale with no shipping costs for 100 lbs. $230 for a 1 hp tefc motor by accident, was supposed to be 3/4 hp. I will modify it for a minimal cost, but again I cannot recommend for a newbie. It is a ripper grinder, but has its limitations just so you know.
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  #22  
Old 01-28-2017, 08:53 AM
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Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
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As I said last Sunday, we're looking forward to your review of this sander after you've had a chance to try it out. The wide platen isn't optimal but maybe the belt will move over or maybe the platen can be cut down. Hard to tell with all that safety shielding on it in the picture. Maybe you could put a 2" wide piece of steel on top of that platen, if so that would solve that issue.

Nothing wrong with flat grinding, none of the little grinders really offer much for hollow grinding anyway....


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  #23  
Old 01-28-2017, 09:14 AM
relentlessknive relentlessknive is offline
 
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nice first knives, and yeah 1 inch belt sanders are not so great.
Someone out there makes a 2 inch wide that looks a lot like what you showed.

Since you have a forge, you might try heating up to forging temp then reducing
the bevels with a hammer. After that there will be less to grind, and your blade will be forged.
Then if you follow up with proper heat treatment. after your done grinding, heat to proper temp....you can tell temp via color if you don't have a temp gauge, then ,quench in water for w-2 steel....(read up on this first)
I think most files are w-1 or W-2....then temper. So more work, but less initial cash outlay etc.
Remember people have been making blades for thousands of years, and for a long time blades ruled the world as modern military weaponry. So sometimes it is good to learn the old ways first.
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  #24  
Old 01-28-2017, 08:57 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Ray the 2x48 platen and side is all one solid piece of cast steel. It is a big angle with the 2 1/2" platen area machined onto it and I am guessing was flame case hardened. I have done that to cast steel with a high carbon content. I will have to machine the face down to put a removable platen on there when it starts to get grooves in it, but it is a long platen and very hard. My RC60 scratcher barely scratches it at all. My son is coming over on Monday to help me mount it onto my cart which I will reinforce with plywood.
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  #25  
Old 01-29-2017, 08:55 AM
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Interesting. But, so far I haven't heard you say anything that would prevent you from attaching another piece of steel or pyroceram on top of the original platen. If there is enough adjustment in the wheels to handle the extra thickness adding a 2" platen on top of the old one could turn it into a workable flat grinder...


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  #26  
Old 01-29-2017, 11:14 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Ray, there is no adjustability. The rollers are attached to the platen angle plate and the drive wheel is where the platen is attached to the motor. I cannot move the platen to make room for a ceramic plate. The platen holds the wheel assy. at the top and only at the top is the wheel adjustable in and out a little bit, the drive wheel is not adjustable in relation to the platen at all. There isn't 1/16" belt adjustability at the bottom, it is where it is which is almost touching the platen. The idler wheel is adjusted to where the belt just touches the platen. I'll fool around with the adjustments once I mount it properly on the cart. No point until then.

Machining the surface of the platen down is the only way to be able to add anything thicker than 1/16". How thick are those pyroceramic plates? I can add some .050 thick O1 is about all I have room for at present, but it is hardened at present so I'll wait before I take it apart for machining. The college has a machinist class and I have a carbide cutter so I'm sure I can trade a student a precision square to cut it down for me. Have all kinds of squares.
As you can see the platen is part of a big angle plate, the platen itself as you can see from the side is 3/8" thick.

Last edited by jimmontg; 05-22-2017 at 09:21 AM.
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  #27  
Old 01-29-2017, 04:37 PM
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Well, bummer. I was hoping that grinder would be a good start for a beginner.

Would it be possible to scrap the existing platen assembly and replace it with something simple and cheap utilizing as much as possible of the original parts? I am thinking of something simple enough for a modestly skilled person to do without needing a machine shop. For instance, build a platen using the original idler wheel and mount the platen to the work bench. Then the motor and drive wheel would be bolted to the table in a position that would allow the belt to fit. A piece of flat stock and some angle iron could get that done. Would that work?


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  #28  
Old 01-29-2017, 05:20 PM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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That may work Ray. There is enough room to machine off 1/8" off of it now without weakening the platen as well. That motor side plate holds the wheel assy. and would have to remain, but could cut the whole platen off and move it back after welding a side plate to the platen to bolt onto the existing motor side plate though. Most colleges with a machinist program will usually take a project like this though. If I knew someone with a mill I'd do it myself. How long and thick are those pyroceramic plates Ray, this platen is 12" long so it will be a long time before I run grooves in it. I don't use the work table to flat grind anyway so I'll grind up and down on the platen in the flat position away from myself.
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  #29  
Old 01-29-2017, 06:36 PM
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Pyroceram is usually about 1/4" thick and comes in most any length, 9" is common.

The key to the modification I am looking for is not needing a machine shop. Think first time knife maker with only basic skills. Find a way to do that and we might have a use for that grinder. Like I said, a flat bar for a platen and a couple pieces of angle iron all bolted together would be ideal. If you can see that working then anyone who can weld or who has access to a mill can do a better job but first there has to be a simple, cheap solution. Otherwise, they might as well buy a Grizzly ...


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  #30  
Old 01-30-2017, 04:18 PM
ash_a101 ash_a101 is offline
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While we're on the topic of grinders... I've managed to track down a nice kit where I live, I'm not rushing out the door to buy it right now, but for $100 I can pick up a grinder without a motor. I haven't even bothered looking for motors, because that part I know I can do. The thing is that it's another 1x42 unit, which I know Ray and a couple others cautioned me against.

I'm just wondering if you guys don't like them because of under-powered motors (a problem I could easily resolve) or is it because of their smaller size?
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