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The Newbies Arena New to Knife Making? Here's all the help you need ...

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  #1  
Old 03-28-2017, 01:51 AM
Toni Toni is offline
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Wooden scales splitting.

So, as I was hammering the pins of a knife one of scales got a small crack in it, and I was wondering if anyone has any tips to avoid that in the future?
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  #2  
Old 03-28-2017, 03:42 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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Toni use a slightly bigger drill bit.

I use a #30 drill bit @ .128 for 1/8" holes (.125). I have carbide drill bits in one size bigger than the standard sizes. If using a 3/32 (.094) pin I will use a #41 drill bit (,096) all the way up to 1/4" (.250) I use a 6.5mm drill bit (.255) or a letter drill "F" at .257. it gives you some leeway when peening pins, but peening is also a learned skill, how far and how much to smack the pin for a domed head. I do not ever peen my handles. Guards and bolsters yes, but not a possibly brittle wood. G10 can take some over peening as well as some some other synthetics can. Beyond this I cannot help except to use a slightly larger hole. Here is a conversion chart for drill bits. Very handy. Grainger carries carbide drill bits a lot cheaper than MSC usually if you want to drill hardened tangs.

http://www.csgnetwork.com/drillsizeconvert.html

https://www.grainger.com/?gclid=CMOb...170328084052:s
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  #3  
Old 03-28-2017, 05:30 AM
jmccustomknives jmccustomknives is offline
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Yeah, it's a learned skill. Every material has a tolerance, knowing how far you can push them takes experience. But generally, dealing with weak, or crosscut woods keep the peen to a minimum.
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Old 03-28-2017, 07:11 PM
damon damon is offline
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simple answer.... don't hit them as hard or as much.
file the pins to just barely above the wood on either side.
then slightly round off the ends of the pin. this will make the pin swell rather than just mushroom. itll take fewer strikes to peen, and be easier to see when the pin has filled the hole. till not take mush to set the pin so itll not push through. do 1 hit per side till the pin is set. how mush you can get away with hitting differs form wood to wood.
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Old 03-29-2017, 06:59 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is offline
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I should add that if using jigged bone or antler I will use domed pins. I clamp a small post I rounded a impression with a drill bit in. I used 1/16 pins or 3/32 depending on size of handle. I put the backside pin onto the clamped post and peen one side then turn it over and do the other. I do this regardless of having glued the pins into the handle. I've had issues with peening and I just use corbys or loveless screws for wood handles.
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  #6  
Old 04-03-2017, 06:29 AM
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Crex Crex is offline
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If your pins and holes are sized correctly as Jim has suggested, just roll the pins under a coarse cut file to "knurl" them up full length. If you are using quality epoxy, you will find you have to either drill them out or destroy the handle to remove. No need to peen.
But.....if you feel you just have too.....what Damon said. Just don't hit them that last time for good measure.
Also annealing the pin material helps alot with brass, copper, & nickel silver. Just heat them to cherry red and plunge into cold water (opposite of blade steel). This will make them dead soft.


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Old 04-03-2017, 09:43 AM
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Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
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Number 30 bit for sure on any 1/8" pin material.

I slowly grind mine to 1/16th above the handle material after the epoxy has fully cured overnight.

Woods get nickel/silver or brass (never stainless) because you just have to hit stainless too hard.

Light taps around the head of the pin and one or two straight on. Do this until the head is sufficiently 'swollen' and stop.

G-10 and Linen/Canvas Micarta you can beat senseless.

With woods, I prefer mini-Corby's.


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Old 04-03-2017, 09:44 AM
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Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
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Watching all these guys on Forged in Fire hammer pins in with epoxy everywhere just makes me cringe.


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Old 04-03-2017, 11:37 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
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Haha Andrew I thought the same thing when I first saw that go on on the show, BUT I do have a good friend that was on the show and they do not have the luxury of time as we do in the shop...but I agree there might be a better way. But I know if it was me and I knew the knives are going to be tested as they are. Next to the blade breaking in half the last thing I would want is to see that handle come losse so I think a lot of them are crunched for time but also want to secure the handle in every way possible....Remember there have been more than a few guys eliminated because of a "safety" issue with the handle
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Old 04-03-2017, 02:48 PM
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Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
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Don't they have corbys or Loveless type fasteners on that show?
Maybe a #30 bit?


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2017, antler, blade, bolsters, bone, brass, conversion, drill, forged, g10, guards, handle, handles, knife, make, material, pins, post, scales, show, simple, small, tips, wood, woods


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