MEMBER ITEMS FOR SALE
Custom Knives | Other Knives | General Items
-------------------------------------------
New Posts | New PhotosAll Photos



Go Back   The Knife Network Forums : Knife Making Discussions > Custom Knife Discussion Boards > Knife Making Discussions > The Newbies Arena

The Newbies Arena New to Knife Making? Here's all the help you need ...

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:04 AM
DennisP76 DennisP76 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6
Hello. Newbie here. Question regarding Case 1836 Bowie

Hey all,
New to the forum.

I recently was given Mt dad's old Case bowie that saw a couple tours in Vietnam and years of abuse after. It's a case 1836. I'm looking at putting on a new handle and cleaning it up "good as new".

Can anyone tell me what the original handle was made of?
Any suggestions on what material to use as a replacement?

I contacted Case directly and they said they have no information on a knife this old.

Thanks
Dennis



Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-18-2017, 08:43 AM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,523
I don't think I'd worry about what the original handle was made of. Instead of making it 'good as new' why not make it better? The old case bowies I've seen had some kind of synthetic handles. If that's what you want for yours then use Micarta. If the handle is wood - or if you'd like it to be wood now - then pick some nice stabilized wood from any knife supply house. Stabilized wood is easy to finish and your family will never have to worry about replacing that handle again, ever....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-18-2017, 09:58 PM
TexasJack's Avatar
TexasJack TexasJack is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Southeast Texas
Posts: 3,022
I agree with Ray. I've fixed up several old knives and they look the best when you just use the best materials and don't worry about what it used to be.

Once you have to replace parts, it loses any "antique" value anyway. So preserve the sentimental part - it was good then and is now updated to great!


__________________
God bless Texas! Now let's secede!!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-22-2017, 09:15 AM
DennisP76 DennisP76 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6
Thanks for the responses guys. Historical accuracy isn't much of a concern. Being a noob, doing it correctly is my biggest concern. Lots of video watching and reading have been done already. Wishing I had more/proper tools at my disposal. I'm a bit nervous trying to drill through scales without a drill press and getting proper alignment. Guess I'll just have to order a few since its not the only knife I plan on ever doing/making.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-22-2017, 10:43 AM
jimmontg jimmontg is online now
Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Mountains of Western NC.
Posts: 795
I love to fix up old knives. Have done a few in th past few years. Be careful taking the old scales off and measure everything. I am disappointed in Case. Try a different office. Call them, do not count on email. I've been through this before, the flunky who answers email may be sitting in the Philippines.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:18 AM
dtec1 dtec1 is offline
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: putnam county NY ....about 45 mins north of new york city
Posts: 1,172
IF you make it good as NEW then why not just go buy a NEW knife or better yet start leaning how to make a NEW knife from scatch. That knife has history and character that once removed can never be put back so IF you do change things make sure that's exactly what you want. Personally I would just sharepen it maybe make a new sheath. If the handle are really bad then yes you could replace them with that sorta knife I would go with wood or the same type of material as the original (not sure what it is without the company's knowledge or at least pics). one thing I would not do is clean up the blade and make it new and shiny if it has patina and wear marks and stuff in it...IT SHOULD the knife went through a war and much use after I would think that war and use would have left its mark and as long as its not causing a functional problem I would leave all that. Just remember a new clean and shiny knife can always be made but getting that patina and every mark that comes with it takes years and years to produce
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-22-2017, 11:21 PM
Andrew Garrett's Avatar
Andrew Garrett Andrew Garrett is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Wichita, Kansas
Posts: 3,586
I have refurbished a few old knives that needed repair. I recently did. Japanese Nata. The thread is recent with pictures. If you look at it, you'll see that you can find a happy medium. Clean up the blade without removing it's character. Leave some of the pits and dings. A new handle and fittings, perhaps a sheath. Let it keep it's history, but make it interesting and usable.


__________________
Andy Garrett
https://www.facebook.com/GarrettKnives?ref=hl
Charter Member - Kansas Custom Knifemaker's Association
www.kansasknives.org

"Life is too short to waste time cursing a dull knife."
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-23-2017, 06:06 AM
WBE WBE is offline
Skilled
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 461
It is a phenolic plastic. I have one those that I purchased new in 1967. Good knives, if you have need of a large knife. How worn is the grip? I would do as little as possible to the knife. Just a clean up maybe. The original models like these were used by Carlson's Raiders, USMC, in the pacific, WW-2. They were made by Collins, Kinfolk, Western, and Case. They are commonly called the V-44, but are actually the Collins #18 machete. Original grips were horn and later, phenolic plastic.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-23-2017, 09:01 PM
DennisP76 DennisP76 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6
Thanks for the quick responses. I added pictures to my original post. Apparently they aren't working or aren't fine correctly. The original handle was broken/ worn out/ destroyed. Nothing but a bowie with a brass guard with a hidden tang.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-24-2017, 06:25 PM
DennisP76 DennisP76 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6
Another try for the pictures...



[IMG][/IMG]

[IMG][/IMG]

[IMG][/IMG]
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-25-2017, 02:57 PM
DennisP76 DennisP76 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6
I tried adding pictures again, but got a message saying my post needed Admin approval. Apparently I need to have more posts to make sure I'm not a bot.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-25-2017, 06:28 PM
Ray Rogers's Avatar
Ray Rogers Ray Rogers is offline
Founding Member / Moderator
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Wauconda, WA
Posts: 9,523
Your pictures are there. I don't see anything in the pictures that would change any of the advice you have received so far ....


__________________

Your question may already have been answered - try the Search button first!






Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
antique, bowie, case, cleaning, easy, finish, fixed, fixed blade, handle, handles, knife, knife supply, knives, made, make, making, material, materials, micarta, newbie, old knives, press, supply, vietnam, wood


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie Question MMOMOH-55 Knife Making Discussions 8 12-07-2008 01:16 PM
Hi All. Newbie Here With A Question JoJoKnives Knife Collecting 4 11-05-2005 01:21 PM
Newbie question Mitchell H. Knife Photography Discussion 6 07-08-2005 02:23 AM
newbie question richard johnson The Newbies Arena 2 03-17-2004 07:25 AM
case bowie john costa The Display Case 2 11-18-2002 04:01 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:34 AM.




KNIFENETWORK.COM
Copyright © 2000
CKK Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Powered by ...

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The Knife Network : All Rights Reserved