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-   -   Greeting from a Georgia Noobie & question (http://www.knifenetwork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=61519)

Zelix 05-03-2013 07:43 AM

Greeting from a Georgia Noobie & question
 
Hey I'm humbled by the great work everyone is turning out here. I recently watched a video on knife making and thought I'd join in the fun. My first project will starting from an old file. I want to keep the cost down as I make mistakes on the way.

I'm looking at making a simple tanto styled knife like the one in the picture.

My question is: How do you get the steel black? Is it even possible without special equipment? If its too much to worry with I'll go for a polished steel look.

http://www.galaxyarmynavy.com/prodimages/large/3100.jpg

Thanks for viewing this thread and wish me luck on my first of many knives.

Ray Rogers 05-03-2013 08:18 AM

You paint it. There are several sophisticated coatings available that can be baked on and some that required more complex processes. Bottom line, they are all some form of paint or coating. Unless you want to buy a can of spray paint I don't think it's worth your time to worry about such things before you make a blade that's good enough to justify the added expense.

You'll probably find out that a 'simple tanto' isn't really so simple and that using an old file isn't easy, quick, convenient, or cheap. If that turns out to be true for you then don't get discouraged, just buy $5 worth of good blade steel and make a small hunter or neck knife. Leave the scrap steel and tricky shapes for later when you've learned the basic processes.

Welcome to knife making!

Zelix 05-03-2013 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ray Rogers (Post 458369)
You paint it. There are several sophisticated coatings available that can be baked on and some that required more complex processes. Bottom line, they are all some form of paint or coating. Unless you want to buy a can of spray paint I don't think it's worth your time to worry about such things before you make a blade that's good enough to justify the added expense.

You'll probably find out that a 'simple tanto' isn't really so simple and that using an old file isn't easy, quick, convenient, or cheap. If that turns out to be true for you then don't get discouraged, just buy $5 worth of good blade steel and make a small hunter or neck knife. Leave the scrap steel and tricky shapes for later when you've learned the basic processes.

Welcome to knife making!

Thanks for the reply. I'll skip the painting. I thought that would be a simple shape. I guess I need to keep on looking at what other noobs have done.

What would your recommend for a good steel type? I've never worked with stainless. I prefer carbon blades personally on knives I've bought.

Naboyle 05-03-2013 10:43 AM

1084, 1084, 1084, or even 1084! It's the easiest for us new guys to conquer!

Ray Rogers 05-03-2013 11:30 AM

I agree, 1084 is the simplest, cheapest, and most available carbon steel. However, if you do not plan to do the heat treatment yourself you may find 440C stainless to be more convenient. It is much easier to get one 440C stainless blade heat treated cheaply than one carbon blade...

Zelix 05-03-2013 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Naboyle (Post 458375)
1084, 1084, 1084, or even 1084! It's the easiest for us new guys to conquer!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ray Rogers (Post 458377)
I agree, 1084 is the simplest, cheapest, and most available carbon steel. However, if you do not plan to do the heat treatment yourself you may find 440C stainless to be more convenient. It is much easier to get one 440C stainless blade heat treated cheaply than one carbon blade...


Thanks I'll look into getting some 1084. Then I'll have to research the heat treating as well.

Doug Lester 05-03-2013 12:42 PM

I know that 1084 from The New Jersey Steel Baron (yep, that's the name) is very popular. I use it too, but 1080+ from Alpha Knife Supply and 1075/1080 from Admiral Steel are also good for the beginner. If you want a slightly more complex steel, 5160 has a good reputation.

Doug

R. Yates 05-04-2013 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug Lester (Post 458379)
I know that 1084 from The New Jersey Steel Baron (yep, that's the name) is very popular. I use it too, but 1080+ from Alpha Knife Supply and 1075/1080 from Admiral Steel are also good for the beginner. If you want a slightly more complex steel, 5160 has a good reputation.

Doug

I agree with Doug this site is one of the very best :

http://newjerseysteelbaron.com/

Zelix 06-17-2019 07:05 AM

I've been researching a lot since I've joined. I've also had life issues that's kept me from working on the first knife.

I recently got some 1080 steel from Jantz. I've shaped it. I tried to drill out for the handles but the steel laughed at the bits. I can't get the holes drilled thru it.

I asked the people at Jantz if the steel was annealed. She said it was.


I'm not sure if there is a special type of drillbit...or something I need to do to get the holes drilled.

It's really crazy as I've seen millions of youtube videos of people drilling the holes out without any problems.

Any ideas?

Doug Lester 06-17-2019 05:30 PM

Not a lot to go on there, Zelix. I would take the lady's word that the steel is annealed. Have you heat treated it any? If you have there can be a problem with hardened steel. How much pressure are you putting on the drill? Putting a lot of pressure on the bit can work harden the steel. Use a lubricant and feed the bit slowly and let it cut through the steel.

For the problem that you are facing now you can get some carbide bits to drill out the pin holes. Unfortunately, the carbide bits don't come in the "in between" sizes like regular bits that can be had in letter and metric sizes and nominal size pins won't fit in nominal size holes. You might need to get yourself a rotary tool with some carbide bits to slightly ream the holes to get the pins to fit.

Doug

Zelix 06-18-2019 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doug Lester (Post 498867)
Not a lot to go on there, Zelix. I would take the lady's word that the steel is annealed. Have you heat treated it any? If you have there can be a problem with hardened steel. How much pressure are you putting on the drill? Putting a lot of pressure on the bit can work harden the steel. Use a lubricant and feed the bit slowly and let it cut through the steel.

For the problem that you are facing now you can get some carbide bits to drill out the pin holes. Unfortunately, the carbide bits don't come in the "in between" sizes like regular bits that can be had in letter and metric sizes and nominal size pins won't fit in nominal size holes. You might need to get yourself a rotary tool with some carbide bits to slightly ream the holes to get the pins to fit.

Doug


Thanks for the reply. I didn't heat treat it at all. I might have put too much pressure on the drill bit. I'll get some carbide bits and give them a try.

Crex 06-19-2019 06:27 AM

Drill bit may have been slightly dull. There's a tendency to apply more pressure when a bit doesn't cut and you wind up with the issue Doug is talking about.
Shouldn't need carbide to drill 1080. Also use a center punch to spot start your hole and keep the bit from skating. If you are drilling larger holes for large pins, maybe start with a smaller fresh bit to drill pilot holes first, then enlarge with larger bit.
Learn to check bit for sharpness before you start and learn to sharpen the dull ones. Makes life a lot simpler when it comes to drilling metals.

ps - where in SW GA? You may be near one of our GA Guild members and get some help from them.

Zelix 06-19-2019 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crex (Post 498873)
Drill bit may have been slightly dull. There's a tendency to apply more pressure when a bit doesn't cut and you wind up with the issue Doug is talking about.
Shouldn't need carbide to drill 1080. Also use a center punch to spot start your hole and keep the bit from skating. If you are drilling larger holes for large pins, maybe start with a smaller fresh bit to drill pilot holes first, then enlarge with larger bit.
Learn to check bit for sharpness before you start and learn to sharpen the dull ones. Makes life a lot simpler when it comes to drilling metals.

ps - where in SW GA? You may be near one of our GA Guild members and get some help from them.

Thanks. I appreciate the help.

I'm not in SW GA anymore. I'm living up in Lawrenceville, GA now.

Crex 06-19-2019 02:23 PM

You are surrounded by GA Guild members in that area. Check the Georgia Custom Knifemakers' Guid facebook page. We will be having the next meeting just up the road in Braselton. You are definitely welcome to attend and meet a bunch of makers from your area. Great networking op. We are a teaching guild and anyone interested in knives/knifemaking/supporting crafts are always welcome.

jimmontg 06-20-2019 08:07 AM

Grainger Industrial Supply and MSG carry "in between" carbide drill bits. I use a number 30 or .128 carbide drill through hardened stainless and tempered back Nicholson files for 1/8th inch pins. I have carbide bits in #41 .099 for 3/32, I have them up to 1/4 or 6.5 mm for .255 all to make clearance holes for handles and the uncommon bolster I may. I made a 12 pin handle and using the 128 was a life saver on getting them to fit and to not possibly crack the ironwood handle material during expansion contraction temperature changes. Super tight pins just squeeze all the glue out of the hole, so rough sanding the pins is a must.
I have found that I can sharpen the straight two flute carbide bits with a diamond sharpener.

Don't try to drill without a drill press or cutting fluid, I use tap magic. Carbide drill bits are brittle and trying to hand drill is guaranteed to break an expensive drill bit. Be careful not to use too much pressure or too high a speed especially on stainless.


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