View Full Version : San Mia Powder Blade


DiamondG Knives
09-11-2004, 02:42 PM
Just thinking out loud here, was thinking of making a all powder San Mia Billet.

Question: How High Carbon is too high carbon? Im wondering about using Kelly Cupples formula for 4600E powder with added graphite. This will allow you to make the carbon content of the center core basicly anything you want it to be. Thinking that I might want to use brake filings as the lower carbon outer shell .

What thickness should the center core be in relation to the outer skin? Larger? Smaller? Equal?

I have noticed on some of the Swedish laminate blades that the inner core is rather large in relation to the outer skin. But I belive these are all stainless construction

Anyone have any ideas on what would be the "right" way to approach this?

Appreciate your thoughts here.

God Bless
Mike

VSMBlades
09-11-2004, 03:21 PM
Also thinking out loud. could you make a can,(I suppose this is how you were going to do this) and put a piece of 0-1 or L-6 down the center and then put your powder around it. That might make for an interesting pattern especially with brake turnings and maybe a few small pieces of cable. On the matter of the size of the center piece compared to the outsides, in my case I would need to make the center large so I would be sure there was some decent material in the edge section of the blade, but with the stuff I have seen you turn out lately I would say you could make it any size you wanted. I love the damascus stuff you have made lately. another interesting idea would be to make a "traditional" japanese style steel with a hard jacket around a soft tough core. maybe seperate the powders with a thin nickle sheet or a thin sheet of A36.

Larrin
09-11-2004, 03:32 PM
Just for the record, it's spelled San Mai, but I don't know much else about it. I'd have to talk to my daddy.

DiamondG Knives
09-11-2004, 09:17 PM
Joe: Thanks for the kind words.
I had thought about doing a twist on the traditional blade style. just making it with powder!
Just wanting to figure out what to use for the low carbon, and just how "Low Carbon" is the low carbon.

Larrin:
Thanks for the correction

God Bless
Mike

VSMBlades
09-12-2004, 04:26 PM
I might think about using A36 filings, or maybe see if you could get it in pre powered form. you might be able to find some very small steel shot like bb's but not plated. then put them in a lower carbon matrix. with a core of high carbon seperated from the rest by thin nickle. I know it is getting complicated but that is what my mind is showing me.

Best of luck..

jonwelder
09-24-2004, 11:52 PM
Hey guys, You may want to read this first, befor you use the brake turnings! I made a can from steel tubing, filled it with 1095, 15n20 (for contrast) some cable, and 1084, then filled it with brake turnings, just to fill all the voids. (we need a good laugh once in a while right?) Well, it all welded great, except the cable didn't weld to anything, the other metal all welded up, the brake turnings all returned to a solid, and it looked real good, Lots of contrast. I left a sample on my desk overnight, only to find in the morning the brake turnings had rusted SEVERLY,, it looked just like the brake rotor it was cut from! My lesson: don't use brake turnings, unless you can keep it from rusting, and returning to it's former life. I believe I did not get the cable clean enough, thats why it didn't weld. --jon

Larrin
09-25-2004, 11:23 AM
About the thickness of the core in relation to the outer layers: it depends on what you want, and how much work you want to do. The bigger the outer layers are in relation to the core, the more toughness you will have (assuming you are using a tough steel on the outer layers), but if you are using a very soft steel, it may be to bendy. If you use a thicker core, you are going to have to forge it down to the edge, unless you only want the san mai to cover the top of the blade. With a thin core, all you would have to do is weld it and grind it.

DiamondG Knives
09-28-2004, 08:42 PM
Jon:
Just a thought here, did you use anything to neutralize the etchant? If not, thats your culprit. It will keep working and for a mighty fine rust pattern. I use ammonia, then scrub good with dish soap, dry, warm it up, then coat with WD40.


Just a thought

God Bless
Mike