View Full Version : TiN (titanium nitride coating


Don Robinson
05-13-2003, 05:52 PM
Do any of you guys have a reliable, inexpensive source for TiN coating? I want to coat the bolsters on a small pocket knife I'm working on.

In case someone isn't familiar with this process, it gives a permanent gold color by vapor deposition on the object.

I'm going to gold anodize (or maybe TiN)the Ti liners and use gold lipped MOP for the scales.

I used to belong to the Knife-List, and I remember Larry Harley used to represent one of the TiN companies, but I don't have a way of reaching Larry now.

I'll appreciate any info you can give me.

:D

Don Cowles
05-13-2003, 06:44 PM
Don, Here's Harley's contact info:

info@lonesomepineknives.com
Lonesome Pine Knives
348 Deerfield Drive
Bristol, TN 37620
Shop 423-878-5368
Cell 423-571-0638
Home 276-466-6771

ted moore
05-13-2003, 07:15 PM
Hey Don

I use , Richter Precision Inc.
1021 Comcrl Av
East Petersburg Pa.

phone 717 560 9990

Ted

Jlott
05-18-2003, 07:25 PM
notorious for wearing off..scratching..and several other unsightly events... bolsters probably wouldnt be the best thing to coat
with TI... unless it was totally an art knife that gets no wear...
boron carbide is the way to go..however most facilites that did it for us in the industry have ceased... I wish you luck with your coating experience...JL

Don Robinson
05-19-2003, 08:22 AM
Originally posted by Jlott
notorious for wearing off..scratching..and several other unsightly events... bolsters probably wouldnt be the best thing to coat
with TI... unless it was totally an art knife that gets no wear...
boron carbide is the way to go..however most facilites that did it for us in the industry have ceased... I wish you luck with your coating experience...JL

I think you are confusing TiN with titanium anodizing. TiN wears great. It's very hard, harder than the blade, and you'd just about have to grind it off to scratch it or remove it. On the other hand, the oxide coating which gives Ti anodizing its color will soon wear off corners that are exposed to rubbing, such as pocket wear. That's the reason I only anodize the insides and edges of liners.

I haven't received a reasonable reply from the TiN companies that I contacted, except for one that wants a minimum $100 order.

Harley says he doesn't rep TiGold any longer. Maybe none of the TiN companies wants a knifemaker's business any longer. :(

Jlott
05-19-2003, 11:53 AM
most of the providers of coatings have just about all turned their
backs on individual knifemakers... bodycoat inc. just up and turned its back on all knifemakers a few months back.. because they became iso 9000 certifed.. and say that we dont
fit their work profile now without costing them too much money in paperwork to fit us into their iso9000 work profile... ( we can thank the europeans for iso 9000) .... any way.. on the subject of
TiNi coating...sorry.. but ive seen hundreds of benchmades and other brands with Ti coated blades that it just wears off to know different from what your telling us here... and as for the buffing it off.. ive done probably 50 of them.. you simply use a $3 tube of "EMMORY" ROUGE from HOME DEPOTS TOOL DEPT.... on a hard
felt buff and it comes right off like paint... its not molecularly bonded..it's simply adhered... and it comes off with everyday wear, as for anodized Ti.. I DONT KNOW OF ANY CERTIAN
BRAND NAME KNIFE COMPANY THAT USES ANODIOZING ON THEIR
BLADES AND CALLS IT TiNitride coating...unless you remember when black coatings first came out.. and then got a bad rep for
practically rubbing off...they soon saw that the market for blacked blades was huge and proceded to say they had corrected the problem when in reality all they did was really start using TiNi as they should have to begin with... but then..that cost more...
i wish you luck and many years of long wear with your bolsters !
have good week! jl

Yodel
05-25-2003, 05:55 PM
As a note, until very recently benchmade never used Titainium nitride in their blade finishes. Don't confuse Black-T (Benchmade's favorite paint like teflon finish) with Titainium nitride. TiN is imperceptibly softer than boron carbide, and you'd really be hard pressed to tell a difference in wear. Some recent Benchmades have been coming out with boron carbide, but I know my pieces from 2 years back are all teflon.

Daniel J
07-01-2003, 09:20 PM
I remember Buck knives releasing a series of "goldbuck" knives (or something to that effect.) They would use a TiN coating on standard production blades, then chisel-gring the final edge. This left a very thin TiN edge which is supposed to be almost as hard as ceramic, and alot more durable due to the steel backing.
Has anyone used any of these knives?

Mike Hull
07-01-2003, 10:52 PM
Bodycote will do work for knifemakers. They will not do coating for individuals anymore.

george tichbour
07-15-2003, 06:36 AM
Given that the TiN coating on my drill bits seems to be unaffected when drilling steel I give it a pretty high wear resistance rating.

Jeff Higgins
09-17-2003, 06:44 AM
Having a long machinist background, I can tell you that TiN is sketchy in quality, even from the same maker. I've had drill bits and turning bits wear right down after a few turns, and the coating totally gone, and sometimes the coating stays forever and the bit performs as advertised. IMO TiN is pretty, and like a pretty fishing lure, it tends to catch "us" rather than the fish... or something like that... *scratches head*