View Full Version : I.D. This Bali


hammerdownnow
03-03-2003, 01:11 AM
Does anyone have an idea where this may have came from? It's tight won't swing. It is new or near mint. Came from an antique shop. (mis?)-marked as "German knife".Green inserts: man made material,as is three red dots in the lock. Any help would be appreciated.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid53/p6e69c9b45b479ccd904b2eb8ddb756a9/fc8f7908.gif

tonyccw
03-03-2003, 06:42 AM
That's what we refer to as a Phillipine handmade. Blade would be of forged high carbon steel, with U-Channel construction brass handles. This one is somewhat special in that it has the Eagle motif in the guard.

hammerdownnow
03-03-2003, 10:39 AM
Thanks for the quick reply Tony. About what i figured. Do they hand make the handmades in factories or in home workshops? Are some makers from there more collectible than others? Are different makers identifiable by there style, materials or finish?
There is no makers mark on this piece. Is it possible to track down the the maker of an individual knife? Sorry for all the questions,but you guys opened up this can o' worms.:D

tonyccw
03-03-2003, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by hammerdownnow
Do they hand make the handmades in factories or in home workshops? Are some makers from there more collectible than others? Are different makers identifiable by there style, materials or finish? There is no makers mark on this piece. Is it possible to track down the the maker of an individual knife? Let's see. They're all usually handmade in a home workshop type setting. Balisong's are a cottage industry, so there will be lots of makers (mostly unknown) that are then sold through a middleman. They don't really have the individual maker system we have here, so tracking down the specific maker would be quite a challange. Although there are a handful of makers that are well known and do mark the bali's they make. Your best indication would be those eagle guards, as that's distinctive of a specific regional style. As for collectibility, it's hard to say. There are some collectors out there for these types of bali's, but most of the ones I know are more into the modern American styled bali's that was popularized by Benchmade.

I'll defer the finer details of this question to fellow formite, Examonlyf (Pete). He's more versed in these styles of bali's than I am.

hammerdownnow
03-03-2003, 11:53 AM
Thanks again, Interesting subject!

ExamonLyf
03-05-2003, 04:04 PM
Tony nailed it actually..., very very tough to nail down specifics on FHM's.., including when they were made.

As he mentioned.., there are also not many makers that incorporate what we would call a "Maker's Mark"..., but there are a few left. Most use hatch marks, or a marking on the latch to identify their work.., and most of those with an Eagle are/were made in "Buli".., a small suberb of Taal. Taal is a larger city in Batangas Province.., and surrounded by most of the Barrio hamlets where this cottage industry exists.

Having stated that.., more recent FHM's are totally impossible to localize, simply because the population has become much more migrant.., and younger family members from Batangas.., have taken up the trade in areas that are (a) safer.., and (b) more profitable.

Sadly.., the quality of the knives has really dropped in recent years.., but you can loosen that guy up for swinging quite easily.

Get a wide-faced clotted screw driver.., and using a towel or cloth to protect the brass, just rock (gently) laterally up by the pins.., and against the inside wall of the channel. It doesn't take much.., as the pins are not substantial in strength and stretch easily. Just do a little at a time and it will be swinging in about 5 minutes... :)

They are fun to collect.., but many made in the last 15-20 years.., have way too much steel behind the edge unless you run across one from a skilled maker. They may be somewhat sharp initially.., but re-profiling may be necessary to restore a good edge if you use it for cutting.

Have fun with it :)