View Full Version : Which methods of wire inlay ??


BrianT
01-20-2003, 10:06 PM
I am familiar with a couple of methods of wire inlay and would like to get some input on which methods are best. The first method is to cut a channel and then make two more cuts--one on each side of the channel-- to form a dovetail. When the wire is chased into the channel, it expands to fill the dovetail.

The other method that I am aware of is to cut the channel and then using a graver sharpened like a chisel, undercut the channel by placing the chisel at a 90 degree angle to channel and tapping the graver. This undercuts and raises th edge of the channel slightly. This process is continued on both sides of the channel with each undercut right next to the previous one. When the wire is chased into the channel, the raised edge of the channel folds down over the wire and the wire is pressed into the undercuts.

Are there any other methods being used? I realize that the use that the inlay will see helps determine the method used to inlay the wire. I am curious as to which methods are being used for which applications (high recoil firearm , gent's folder, and what may fall in between).

Thanks for your input
Brian

Tim Adlam
01-20-2003, 10:40 PM
Brian,

I've used a combination of those techniques on the same job. A lot depends on the width of the channel and how tight the curves are. Ron Notts method works really well for fine-line inlay.
I try to be conservative when it comes to inlays. I go for the strongest mechanical fix no matter what the end use will be.
I've heard horror stories about inlays popping off from firearms inlayed by well-known engravers! That's not too cool!
Although knives aren't subjected to the stresses that guns are...I feel it's good practice to make sure your inlays are really secure.
I opt for the cut channel/dovetail method wherever it can be used...especially for straight or slightly curved lines.

Tim

ron p. nott
01-21-2003, 08:06 AM
Brian . Tim. both methods are very good .. i like to use the 2nd method that brian talked about also i use the spike method it works like the first method that jim talked about but instead of cutting a channel you would make small spikes to look like tha face of a wood file ..

BrianT
01-21-2003, 08:20 PM
Thanks Tim and Ron

I was curious if the old ways were still the best or if there were some new ideas. Ron, I find your spike method very interesting. do you raise all the spikes all from one direcion and then chase the wire moving in the same direction?

Thanks
Brian

ron p. nott
01-21-2003, 08:25 PM
Hi Brian.. i make my spikes go in 2 different directions .. Then as i punch the wire in i push the wire forward..

BrianT
01-21-2003, 08:38 PM
Thanks Ron

As I said, this is a very interesting method. As I look at the photos of your wonderful engraving that you post here, I find myself wondering how much wire you must have inlayed over your career.

Thanks
Brian

ron p. nott
01-22-2003, 08:01 AM
Hi Brian .. when i buy gold wire i buy 50 ft at a time ..and that is 35ths thick.. then i draw it down to the size that i need ..50 ft will last me about 6mo. and i have been doing this full time since 1995.

Joe Mason
01-22-2003, 05:55 PM
Hi Ron
Where do you get your gold wire?

Joe Mason

BrianT
01-22-2003, 08:37 PM
Hi Ron

I figured that you must use a lot of gold wire after seeing some of your work on Colt SAA's that you have done, but I couldn't imagine how much it actually was. Thanks for the numbers.

Have fun at Reno. Maybe I can make it next year.

Brian


Joe

You can get 24K gold wire and Fine Silver wire at most jewelry supply companies like Rio Grande.

Brian