View Full Version : My First Sheath


Colin KC
11-02-2002, 11:49 AM
Here it is, my first sheath, LMK what you think guys (& where I went wrong:rolleyes: )

Here's the knife:Osborn Cable Damascus KC Bowie (http://www.ckdforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=9224)


Here's the sheath too:

http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/500/3sheath-med.jpg


http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/508/3sheathback-med.jpg

Martyn
11-02-2002, 11:56 AM
WOOT!!!!

Nice one mate, very fine stitching for a first and a cracking sheath design. I love the versatility of those designs, if I'm reading it right, can the belt loop be swapped out for a cross-draw or from-the-back version?

Nice job matee!

Colin KC
11-02-2002, 12:01 PM
I love the versatility of those designs, if I'm reading it right, can the belt loop be swapped out for a cross-draw or from-the-back version?


Maybe...:confused:

Colin KC
11-02-2002, 12:05 PM
Aaaaaaahhh!

If you mean can the actualbody of the sheath be seperated from the other thingy, then, in theory yes, but in practice, the thingy was put on damp & the rawhide cross stitching was soaking :rolleyes:

Martyn
11-02-2002, 12:17 PM
Aaaaaaahhh!

Ding! :D :D :D :D :D

If you mean can the actualbody of the sheath be seperated from the other thingy, then, in theory yes, but in practice, the thingy was put on damp & the rawhide cross stitching was soaking :rolleyes:

I'm guessing it's pretty tight then ;) :D

Seriously, I first saw this type of design in one of Sandy's sheaths, though he used a rebate where the "thingy" goes round the main sheath part, so the "thingy" didnt need to be really tight to hold it on. One sheath, but multiple "thingy's" made for all sorts of carry options.

Still, very, very nice work - did I say I'm impressed by the stiching? Where did you get the leather - Tandy?

Colin KC
11-02-2002, 01:24 PM
This is a kind of cross between the one of Sandy's that you mention (woz gonna do the lugs, but forgot:mad: ) & Gib's, I think his are the greatest (no offense to you guys o' course;) , I just love his style, knives & sheaths:D )

Yah,
Got the lot from Tandy, leather, neatsfoot, thread, needles...

One thing I didn't get is one o' them spiky thingies (sat there for ages measuring the whole run in 1/8ths:eek: )

acs1943
11-02-2002, 02:10 PM
Very nice Colin
lot of work but worth the effort

Regards
Alan.
Still crazy after all the years

Colin KC
11-02-2002, 02:23 PM
Yeah Alan,
Well worth it, except that after telling the guy that has it now (my ex boss) not to keep it in the sheath, he goes & cuts an onion up & doesn't clean it afterwards:eek: :eek: :eek: Still, it's his now & if it means that I have to give it a cleanup every now & then, so be it

acs1943
11-02-2002, 02:33 PM
Hey Coiln
thats the way it goes, you must offer to make a kitchen Knife for him.

Alan
Still crazy after all these years

Chuck Burrows
11-02-2002, 09:45 PM
Colin I'm going to have to watch my backside - for a first sheath that is great.

Now I do have some constructive hints though (only a few honest!)

1) get a stitch groover and groove for your seams.

2) use a double needle stitch (ie two threads instead of one)

3) Get an overstitch wheel and use it to mark your stitch length and just as important use it after after sewing (I like a 6 spi). Your stitching is excellent on this sheath as is, but do these things and it will be outstanding.

4) and the final hint get an edge rounding tool (#2). This gives that final finished look.

With these simple changes you will be doing professional work in no time!!!!
If you're not sure what I'm talking about check my tutorial link in the following post
http://ckdforums.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=10172

That really is very nice work and that is from someone who knows and loves the craft!

Chuck

Sandy Morrissey
11-02-2002, 11:24 PM
Colin and Martyn, my friends from British Blades-- I am truly flattered that you guys speak so nicely of my efforts in leather. and even more so when it influences your work. Alas, I can not take credit for that design as it was probably around years before I was hatched. I am sure that would make it a genuine antique as I ain't no spring chicken! I just changed the design a smidgeon and I guesss I must have moved in the right direction! The critique of your sheath,Colin, was a very accurate assesssment by Chuck of the Wild Rose Trading Post, who just happens to be a very accomplished leather craftsman. Between the two of us, we have managed to accumulate a century of practicing the art form we so dearly love. We have too much time invested in order to taint it with blowing smoke up your rear or that of any other new sheath maker. We assume that when a picture is supplied by a sheath maker that he is justifiably proud of it and is asking for comments, preferably of a laudatory nature. And those should be freely offered if the work deserves it. YOUR FIRST SHEATH MOST CERTAINLY DESERVES A SINCERE "WELL DONE" Chuck and I are aware of the ego enhancing nature of an honest compliment (Gawd, how I love 'em) but are also aware that a person learns far more by being shown where improvements can be made. The ones that Chuck mentioned were very minor in nature but are a small way to make a BIG DIFFERENCE in final appearance. You might say that it is the frosting on the cake. Thanks for the opportunity to see your work and I wll look forward to see more--- Sandy

Chuck Burrows
11-02-2002, 11:30 PM
Howdy Sandy-

Got to second that. I'm not out to rain on anyone's parade. And even though my wife says my head is already big enough (I wear a size 8 hat-American of course) I like a pat on the back as much as anyone but only if sincere.

It really is agreat first or second or third effort Colin. I know guys who have been doing leather for years who don't do that good!

Chuck

C.M. Arrington
11-03-2002, 03:01 AM
Nothing wrong with that !!! Nice lines and it works well with the knife.

Colin KC
11-03-2002, 06:23 AM
Thanks C.M., Chuck & Sandy,

All criticisms taken on board, thanks guys.

Sandy, I will try those lugs on my next large knife (dont make too many of those) & I will always think of them as Sandy's lugs:p

Chuck, the stitches are 1/8th apart, I'll get a 6tpi one, why go over them after stitching?

C.M. Thanks man, now I know I can do it, life don't seem so bad;) (I worried myself silly since my leatherworker retired)

Alan, still trying to get me to give in & use some of that 440:p

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 10:28 AM
Hey Colin-

You go over it afterwards to even your stitches - it REALLY makes a difference. ASAP I'm going to do an addendum to my straight hole post with before and after pics.

I don't think you've got to sweat doing leather work. Just hope you find it's fun.

Chuck

cactusforge
11-03-2002, 05:26 PM
Colin, Thanks for the kind words I am glad you like my work.
You don't do bad your self, that is a nice sheath but we need a photo of the knife out of the sheath. You are doing great so keep doing what you are doing. Gib

Colin KC
11-03-2002, 06:29 PM
Hey Gib,
You've already seen it, the links in the first post:p

No more bowies for a while though, plenty of other blades for now, but I'd love to try the "Gib look" when I start forging;)

Sandy Morrissey
11-03-2002, 07:52 PM
Colin-- You asked what the over stitch wheel will do and Chuck answered correctly-- If you were to take an over stitch wheel and run it over slghtly dampened leather the resulting impression would also answer that question. The impression so resembles a stitch line that it is often used as a border on some work without the tedium of stitching in reality. The two most popular sizes are 5 and 6 to the inch. I prefer the #5 for leathers over 5/6 oz. in multiple layers and the #6 for lighter leathers. A #7 would be too fine except for gloves or items of a similiar nature, a #4 only in HEAVY harness and weight belts. The schillings expended for these would be a bargain even at an unreasonable price-- I permit myself to grin largely at this point! Sandy

Martyn
11-03-2002, 07:56 PM
Originally posted by helmar4578
The schillings expended for these would be a bargain even at an unreasonable price-- I permit myself to grin largely at this point! Sandy

You're showing your age now sandy, we stopped using pounds, shillings and pence in 1971 ;) :D :D

Wasnt I glad too. I was young then, but my maths is so bad, 12 pence in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound would have seen me bankrupt by now. :D

Sandy Morrissey
11-03-2002, 08:12 PM
Surely you must be referring to maturity of which I have an ample supply. In 1971 I was two years shy of fifty, had the world by the tail. I was not the brightest bulb in the chandelier nor did I realy care, come to think about it. I had been doing leather work for almost 25 years then--- Mature? My wife claims that I am ripe, #### near to the point of being rotten--- Little does she know that I am just getting started-- my past years were just a warm up for the ones in my future. I Will Not be denied----LOL Sandy

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 08:16 PM
You mean I finally figured out that weird money of yours and now I can't use the knowledge. ####! I even figured out what a guinea was!

The only place I differ with Sandy is I prefer 6spi up to about 4 layers of 8/9 oz. It's a bit trickier but I just like it better.
The examples I posted are 3 layers of 8/9 oz with 6 spi.

Now if you can believe it there are pieces of leather work (gloves) with up to 60 SPI! That's right 60 stitches per inch - that means they are about .0016" apart!!! I an hardly see that !
These are refered to by JW Waterer (he was the head of the English Museum of Leather or some such) in one of his books.

Chuck

Sandy Morrissey
11-03-2002, 08:23 PM
Here in Georgia, everyone knows that a guinea is a fowl as in "guinea hen" Yuk Yuk Sandy--

Sandy Morrissey
11-03-2002, 08:29 PM
Chuck likes the smaller, tighter, and more time consuming stitch because he still has a full tank of "get up and go" while mine has "got up and gone!" Sandy

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 08:48 PM
I think I'm at about a quarter of a tank about now!

As the man said, "It ain't the years honey. It's the mileage!"


Chuck

Martyn
11-03-2002, 08:49 PM
Originally posted by Wild Rose
You mean I finally figured out that weird money of yours and now I can't use the knowledge. ####! I even figured out what a guinea was!
Chuck

LOL, it's our unyeilding desire to hang on to the past.

What about the potin, sceatta, florin, groat, angel, ryal, farthing, crown and soverign ;) :D :D

I bet even Sandy doesnt remember some of these ;) :D :D

Martyn
11-03-2002, 08:59 PM
Originally posted by Colin KC


Yah,
Got the lot from Tandy, leather, neatsfoot, thread, needles...

One thing I didn't get is one o' them spiky thingies (sat there for ages measuring the whole run in 1/8ths:eek: )

Col, did Tandy stock those spike thingy's?

From Sandy/Chuck's comments, they are worth the shillings, groats or potins, so I''l have to get one.

I'm thinking 6 spi, I like the tight look of Chucks stitching...

Come to think of it, I'm sure I've seen the tool with swappable wheels, so maybe that would be worth the investment. Get one handle and several wheels...

Hmmmm...

Guys?

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 09:17 PM
The swappable wheel ones are actually stitch markers and the wheels are a bit narrow for overstitching (about 40 thousandths I have no idea what that is in metric).
I don't know about price over there (not cheap here), but Jos Dixon is an english leather tool maker and they are some of the best in the world. You get what you pay for, especially with leather tools.

For an overstitch wheel the the wheel needs to be best at least 80 thousandths wide.

What about the potin, sceatta, florin, groat, angel, ryal, farthing, crown and soverign
I know florin, groat, farthing, crwon, and soverign but the other ain't got a clue! I was in the SCA for along time so those kinda things came up.

BTW for our UK Brethern - the British sporting leather of the late 19th/early20th is one of my passions. I love that stuff and I'm working on some designs based on originals. In fact Fiebings British Tan is my favorite leather dye. You can do lots of things with it.

Chuck





Chuck

Sandy Morrissey
11-03-2002, 09:19 PM
Martyn, I have seen the combo of handle and several interchangeable wheels but would opt for the single unit. I personally prefer the bent shaft of the single unit over the straight shaft of the combo. I also am the type that can never find the correct socket when using a socket wrench so would probably misplace the marker wheels. Also, I am rather laid back (definition-- lazy) and would not cater to changing wheels-- first thing I would probably do would be to lose the axle screw or strip the threads. I am a firm believer in "Murphy's Law" --Anything that can go wrong will go wrong---- Just another member of the Martyn/Martin club.

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 09:31 PM
Speaking of Murphy.. (he's been here all day by the way)

Did you ever see the movie Into The West.

The scene where the welfare guy asks the kid what his anme is and he says Murphpu (actually the kid says it more like Morphy). Anyway then the welfare guy asks him what his first name is and the kid goes blank and then blurtsout
Mr Morphy!!!

Loved it - but I'm into simple pleasures

Chuck

Chuck Burrows
11-03-2002, 09:32 PM
Speaking of Murphy.. (he's been here all weekend by the way - I wish he'd go visit elsewhere - I keep telling him you're a real friendly guy Sandy)

Did you ever see the movie "Into The West"?

The scene where the welfare guy asks the kid what his name is and he says Murphpu (actually the kid says it more like Morphy). Anyway then the welfare guy asks him what his first name is and the kid goes blank and then blurtsout
Mr Morphy!!!

Loved it - but I'm into simple pleasures

Chuck

Martyn
11-03-2002, 11:58 PM
Thanks for the advice guys, I'll keep a look out for single wheel units then.

Originally posted by Wild Rose


What about the potin, sceatta, florin, groat, angel, ryal, farthing, crown and soverign
I know florin, groat, farthing, crwon, and soverign but the other ain't got a clue! I was in the SCA for along time so those kinda things came up.


Chuck, SCA? .... The Society for Creative Anachronism????

The sceatta is a saxon coin originally, the potin dates bak to 60BC, strange there are no date stamped examples in existence - I wonder why? ;) :D :D

PS sorry Col, seemed to have hijacked your thread and turned it into a discussion of early British coinage...

Bet ya didn't see that comming? :D :D :D

EDIT: useful link alert for UK members....

Joseph Dixon Leather Tools Homepage:
http://www.josephdixon.co.uk/

Their factory is about 40 miles from where I live :rolleyes:

####, we got the resources in the UK, it's just piecing them together.

Reminds me of the time I ordered some "renwax" from Texas Knife supply for $15 plus shipping - cos everyone was raving about it, when it arrived in the UK, the tin said "renaissance wax - made in London" Doof! I never made the connection. I looked em up, same size tin ?2.50, half the shipping costs, no import tax etc. etc. Geno says I have the well travelled, cultural variety. :D

I guess Murphy was at my house that day ;) :D

Chuck Burrows
11-04-2002, 01:32 AM
Yep the Society for Creative Anachronism - I first got involved back in 1970 or so and then wandered in and out (I'm not much of a joiner and hate politics). Was the founding father of the Leathersmith's Guild in An Tir (Northwest USA), but left before it really got off the gorund so don't know much about it.

Glad you found Jos Dixon so close, their tools are very nice. Life is strange isn't it.

Here's another possibility for English leather suppliers. Bought a 2 oz calfskin from Tandy (which they say comes from over there) a while back and the tannery stamp says W. Pearce. Maybe you can track them down.

The book I mentioned earlier is "Leather Craftsmanship" by JW Waterer who was in 1968 the secretary for the Museum of Leathercraft in London. Some of the work in there turns me green with envy.

Hasta Manana-
Chuck
BTW I'm a big Red Dwarf fan and of course the Doctor....
Maybe I should go fix a curry?????

Colin KC
11-04-2002, 04:20 AM
Martyn,
Yes Tandy do do dem don't dey:p

I'll have a look when I get back from work & let you know

I'll prob go for 6spi (although it's a toss up whether I go for a multi one or do the single tool thang (if 6spi turns out too much, I'll have to get another one @ 5spi:eek: ))

Martyn
11-04-2002, 10:25 AM
Originally posted by Wild Rose
Yep the Society for Creative Anachronism -


On the point of history, I came accros this the other day....

GOVERNMENT SPECS

The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4
feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that
gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and
the US railroads were built by English expatriates.

Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first
rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-
railroad tramways, and that's the gauge they used.

Why did "they" use that gauge then? Because the people who built
the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for
building wagons, which used that wheel spacing.

Okay! Why did the wagons use that odd wheel spacing? Well, if they
tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on some of
the old, long distance roads, because that's the spacing of the
old wheel ruts.

So who built these old rutted roads? The first long distance roads
in Europe were built by Imperial Rome for the benefit of their
legions. The roads have been used ever since. And the ruts? The
initial ruts, which everyone else had to match for fear of
destroying their wagons, were first made by Roman war chariots.
Since the chariots were made for or by Imperial Rome they were all
alike in the matter of wheel spacing.

Thus, we have the answer to the original question. The United
States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from
the original specification (Military Spec) for an Imperial Roman
army war chariot. MilSpecs and Bureaucracies live forever.

So, the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what
horse's "rear end" came up with it, you may be exactly right.
Because the Imperial Roman chariots were made to be just wide
enough to accommodate the back-ends of two war horses.

:D

Colin KC
11-04-2002, 12:02 PM
A mine of useful information (or something like that;) )

Martyn
11-05-2002, 10:22 AM
Just out of interest, I've ordered Tandy leather's catalogue *and* a catalogue/price list direct from Joseph Dixon.

It'll be interesting to see if Tandy stock the J.Dixon tools and how their "reseller" Prices compare. I'm thinking it shouldn't be any cheaper than direct from the maker, but that doesnt always hold true - sometimes the dealer/reseller can pass on some of their discount to the consumer.

Colin KC
11-05-2002, 10:28 AM
Great plan Martyn,
I'll hold off till then (doing a persian fighter, a damascus sword & matching knife first, won't need any l/working tools till after that)

LMK on the pricing (not that a few pence makes too much difference) Still, make sure that if Tandy do sell Dixon tools, they don't import them from the States:p

Martyn
11-05-2002, 11:28 AM
Originally posted by Colin KC
Still, make sure that if Tandy do sell Dixon tools, they don't import them from the States:p

They're the better ones, aged, travelled and well balanced ;) :p :p :p

Chuck Burrows
11-05-2002, 01:53 PM
Hey Martyn and Colin-Is there an English Tandy? Interesting if so. Also do you know that they have a wholesale club, well at least over here they do.

Here in the USA they don't carry them. I found them at Siegel http://www.siegelofca.com.

Chuck

Martyn
11-05-2002, 04:20 PM
Yeah Chuck, there is an English Tandy, well a mixture of a couple of company's, here's the UK website...

http://www.pearcetandy.com/

No online catalogue though.

Thanks for the Siegel link, I'll be sure to compare the J.Dixon prices with theirs, be sure it isn't cheaper to import from the states. Sounds bizarre, but it may not be that daft.

Chuck Burrows
11-05-2002, 04:25 PM
Martyn-

I get dealer prices from Tandy and can order from Weaver so if you guys want to get certain things we could find out what costs would be and compare. I'd be glad to order for you and ship.

Chuck

Colin KC
11-05-2002, 04:42 PM
Yeah Chuck,
It's where I got my supplies for the sheath that this thread was about, oh, so long ago:p

Colin KC
11-05-2002, 04:45 PM
Missed that one Chuck, (had my reply sitting there for a while & you slipped in :) )
Sounds promising, you know this sheath lark ain't so bad, I don't know why I worried so

Chuck Burrows
11-05-2002, 04:57 PM
It does get into the blood and you definitely have a talent for it. And don't let mistakes or whatever get you down. I am now on my THIRD attempt to get a belt done right! (thank God for patient customers)

Chuck

Martyn
11-05-2002, 05:58 PM
Originally posted by Wild Rose
Martyn-

I get dealer prices from Tandy and can order from Weaver so if you guys want to get certain things we could find out what costs would be and compare. I'd be glad to order for you and ship.

Chuck

Thanks Chuck, that's a kind offer, I'll be sure to post the prices of factory direct J.Dixon tools too, so if there is anything left in the world of leathercraft you dont already own, I'd be happy to send it your way if it's cheaper from the factory. Should be interesting to see how the prices come out.

It's all quiet here now, dont know about you Col, but it's been like a night in Bhagdad here, my cat has taken up permanent residence under the stairs. ;)

Chuck Burrows
11-05-2002, 06:23 PM
Thanks Martyn. Actually I have a pretty basic tool kit. I've made some of my own tools and still have several of my beginning Craftsman stuff that has held up very well over the last 40 odd years. There are some other tools I'd like to have which would make my work easier (punches of various sorts mainly), but I've always made do and have just never gotten around to getting them.
In a way keeping things spare makes me seek out new and unique ways of doing stuff, especially deco items. Kinda of like a painter using a "limited" palette of colors. I know guys who own hundreds of deco stamps and the idea just overwhelms me - I'd spend too much time figuring out what to use!
It's part of why I feel a kinship with the NTM movement - getting back to basics. Form following function is my rule of thumb. The right "lines" need to come first and the fine embellishment is then frosting on the cake. Leather like fine wood has such a beauty all by itself that sometimes that beauty can get lost if over worked.

It will be interesting to see how prices are going to compare. Another US tool source that will make you drool is JWP at http://www.ranch2arena.com. Jeremiah's tools are the ultimate!

Chuck

Martyn
11-05-2002, 06:40 PM
:cough: $50 for a burnisher - gulp!

It is a nice burnisher though.

Chuck, any advice on what tools to get? Just the very bare necessities, I'm not sure if I'll be making many sheaths, though I think I will enjoy it. I do love good quality tools though, it's a failing of mine.

Chuck Burrows
11-05-2002, 07:15 PM
Martyn-

Yes leather tools can get pricey, but they are almost always worth it!

I'll make up a list with the Tandy item numbers - that way you can look at them on line and see what they are. Some things you maybe can get locally instead of through them.
May take me a day or two - I'm still arguing with this D$#@ belt!

Chuck

Martyn
11-05-2002, 07:30 PM
Many thanks Chuck, you're a gentleman ;)

Colin KC
11-06-2002, 01:31 AM
Yeah, thanks Chuck.

Just saw that burnisher too, wow, $50.00:eek:


been like a night in Bhagdad here


No cats here, but our little girl didn't like the bangs too much:(

Martyn
11-06-2002, 08:51 AM
Col - Just got the Tandy catalogue this am. Nice, which leather did you get for your sheath? I notice the catalogue looks to be a US catalogue, some of the leather codes are not listed on the separate price sheet.
Cheers.

Lloyd Hale
11-25-2002, 06:16 PM
as a fledgling knifemaker ,[ 1968 ] I was in Bob Loveless's shop in Lawndale Calif. as he was dipping a sheath in hot wax.......Lloyd he says..making a sheath for a knife is like having sex with a woman ...You don't want the tip to pearce the bottom ,but you want the sides to touch once in a while.....

Colin KC
11-25-2002, 06:47 PM
Nice one Lloyd:p

Martyn, must've missed this one, you have to ring them.
The best thing about the Pearce Tandy franchise over here (& you may appreciate this) is that much (although not all) of the leather needn't make two trips across the Atlantic;) , as the leather that we buy is made (grown:confused: ) over here:D

Martyn
11-25-2002, 06:57 PM
Thank Col, yeah the home "made" leather i8s probably just as good as the travelled version. :p :p :p

MtMike
11-25-2002, 11:26 PM
Hey guys -- I missed this one first time around, and now the pics have gone to bit-heaven. Any chance they can be re-posted? Great discussion, I'd sure like to see the work that started it !
MtMike

Colin KC
11-26-2002, 03:55 AM
Here it is (http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/500/3sheath-med.jpg)

Osborn goodness (http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/500/3c001.jpg)

Back of sheath (http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/508/3sheathback-med.jpg)

finished knife (http://www.britishblades.com/photopost/data/500/3dscf0166-med.jpg)



That should do the job
;)

MtMike
11-26-2002, 09:43 AM
Thanks Colin -- If that were my work I'd re-post it too !! Great stuff, you should be really proud. The whole package just fits so well.
Is the 'girdle' back-stitched to the body of the sheath? I have a Ruana bowie in that style sheath, and they don't tack it down in the back, just draw the lacings nice and snug. I also have a beat up old trade-type knife that is similar to yours in style - may have to put it in a piece of leather like that to dress it up a little. I'm inspired !!
MtMike:)

Martyn
11-26-2002, 10:33 AM
Originally posted by Colin KC

That should do the job
;) [/B]

Hey Colin, you could edit post1 of this thread to show the new picture locations.... ;)

MtMike
11-26-2002, 11:13 AM
Colin, fellow Forumites -- went back and read the whole thread (gotta take a break sometime, and what better entertainment!). Two comments -- the overstitching and edge rounding are definite plusses to the appearance of a finished product, but they also have a practical purpose. Overstitched seams tend to lay flatter, and have less tendency to fray over time. Rounded edges also wear better, less tendency to get nicked up. And a definite thumbs up for the saddle stitch -- not only better looking, but also much stronger -- almost impossible to run if a stitch gets cut, and can be repaired easily without restitching the whole thing.
BUT $50 for a burnishing tool? Maybe I'm missing something here, but polished antler tip works extremely well as a two-ended folder/burnisher, and can be sanded and polished to whatever suits you. Plus the pleasure of making your own:D
Mike

Colin KC
11-26-2002, 01:22 PM
Mike,
Thanks for the kind words, perhaps you could pop over to British Blades (under Martyns signature) there's a few of us trying to make sense of knifemaking in a strange world :rolleyes: & a few pointers & an encouraging word would do wonders for some of us;)


Martyn,
No one likes a smart bumpkin (good idea mind:p ) I'll get on it later.

Chuck Burrows
11-26-2002, 01:45 PM
Mt Mike is spot on.
Here is a photo that illustrates the difference between a saddle(hand) stitch and a machine(lock) stitch that he is talking about.

http://wrtcleather.com/1_forums/lockvshand_stitch.gif

Yep $50.00 for a burnisher is a bit much. Antler, bone, even dense hard wood or plastic make great burnishers. I mainly use antler tips for inside curves and file grooves of varying sizes into pieces for outside edge burnishing.

Martyn-
Feel free to use any photos of mine and any links on your site. One of these days I'll get over there and help out in whatever way I can, but in the mean time use any thing you want as long as you.

Chuck

Colin KC
11-26-2002, 02:13 PM
Thanks guys,
The pics are back up & if anyone is interested, I'll post a pick of my best knifemaking skill, one I'm very proud of, patience;)

Is the 'girdle' back-stitched to the body of the sheath?

No Mike it isn't, if you look closely, you'll see the frog just shining through the "girdle" front, this is the failsafe that I'm sure I'll never need. It hooks just over the rawhide cross on the inside part. But, that girdle was applied damp (after being in the fridge all night, & that rawhide lacing was soaking wet (I don't think it'll move in a million years)


Chuck,
Thanks for that, I would of done that there hand stich but for a couple of things, the two sizes of needle I was supplied were 1. too thick for going through the hole twice & 2. the others were too small for the thread:eek: I'll get back to pearce Tandy & organise the right needles;)

MtMike
11-26-2002, 02:17 PM
Chuck - thanks for the illustration, makes the point eloquently (had to throw in a 50 cent word for our cousins across the pond !) The illustration can also help make the point about repairing saddle stitching -- 2 or 3 loops around either side of the broken stitch will pull things back together, not quite invisibly, but close. And as I said, beats having to restitch the whole thing.
I love my little antler tool -- 4 " long and it has polished flat spots, round spots, thick rounds, narrow rounds -- almost everything I need in one tool. Pretty clever of those mulies to grow their antlers in such useful shapes, eh? :)
Mike

Chuck Burrows
11-26-2002, 02:27 PM
Colin-
Hint for backstitching: Make an awl with a harness needle (round, blunt tip) a size bigger than you use for sewing. Use it to open up your holes a bit when backstitching rather than the regular diamond awl. Wax the tip of the blunt end awl and it will ease through to expand the hole slightly and greatly lessen the chance of cutting your thread.

Mike-
I use Elk brow tines myself. Usually come well polished and of a good size. I have a couple with different grooves, flats, and rounds. I think I'm on my third set - it's surprising how abrasive leather, especially the edge, can be.
Chuck

PS I like 50 cent words!

MtMike
11-26-2002, 02:28 PM
Colin -- thanks for reminding me not to assume anything: I sewed leather for a long while, sticking myself frequently, until a master leatherman told me I was using the wrong needles !! Saddle stitching needles are not sharpened, and fit nicely (twice) thru a 3/32" hole (lets not start that metric thing again!!). Don't mean to be too simplistic, but that tip sure saved me some bloodied finger tips -- and messy prints on my work !!
Mike

Martyn
11-26-2002, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by Wild Rose


Martyn-
Feel free to use any photos of mine and any links on your site.

Chuck

I was about to ask that very thing - thanks Chuck ;)

Colin KC
11-26-2002, 05:06 PM
Thanks guys, great tips indeed to a beginner like me:)

Alan (acs1903:p ) got me one of those roly thingymajigs (wiv spikey bits) with 2x 6tpi & 1x 8tpi:confused: , so I'm on my way to gatting enough tools too really make a mess of things:p

Chuck, BTW, Alan brought back a pic from Belgium of a guy doing leatherwork using a cantilever type pony (his legs held down the outward facing bottom "legs" & a pivot made the sticky-up bits hold the leather (sheath?) securely) Hopefully Alan will see this thread & pipe in, & mebbe post the pic. Alaaaaaannnnnn:D